Plans for Royal Canal cycling route open to consultation

The Newcomen Bridge cycle project will provide improved facilities for cycling and walking along the North Strand Road

Revised plans for the Royal Canal cycle and pedestrian route from Newcomen Bridge to Sherriff Street are now open to consultation. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons/The Irish Times

Revised plans for the Royal Canal cycle and pedestrian route from Newcomen Bridge to Sherriff Street are now open to consultation. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons/The Irish Times

 

Revised plans for the Royal Canal cycle and pedestrian route from Newcomen Bridge to Sherriff Street are now open to consultation.

The Newcomen Bridge cycle project will provide improved facilities for cycling and walking along the North Strand Road by providing a pedestrian bridge adjacent to the existing Newcomen Bridge and North Strand Road Bridge.

The bridge will form an integral part of the Fairview to Amiens Street Cycle Route, providing separate facilities for pedestrians and more space for cyclists on the existing bridge.

The Part 8 planning application was lodged earlier this year.

The bridge will cross over the railway and canal to the east of the existing Newcomen Bridge and will provide an independent structure not supported from the existing bridge.

The works will include alterations to the junction of North Strand Road and Ossory Road as well as ancillary services.

Ciarán Cuffe, chairman of the transport strategic policy committee at Dublin City Council, said he is strongly in favour of the proposal.

“This has been under discussion for some time and it was sent back for consideration with some modifications made in it. It’s a good proposal and I certainly favour making it easier for those who walk or cycle in the city,” he said.

“People are concerned about security issues as the route will be opening up part of what was a backland area but I think those concerns can be overcome through good design,” he said.

“We have seen an extraordinary increase in the amount of cyclists in the city and I think that we want to build on that.”

Mr Cuffe, a Green party councillor, said Copenhagen and Amsterdam should be role models for Dublin city.

He said the cycle to work scheme, the Dublin port tunnel which has taken has heavy trucks out of the city and lower speed limits in the city - have made Dublin city a better place to cycle.

Mr Cuffe said there have been several meetings and forums held about the proposals and there are some concerns about the project.

“The proposal allows for the opening of certain streets on a trial basis. There are concerns about maintenance and anti social behaviour but I think we can trial it and see how it works out,” he said.

People can make their views about the proposal to traffic@dublincity.ie.