Man apologises to Goffs over defamatory posts on social media

Incident arose out of the sale in 2011 of a horse in which he had an interest

In a statement read before Ms Justice Leonie Reynolds in the High Court on Thursday, James Carney apologised about posts he had made arising out of the sale of Sensational Sema, of which he was part owner

In a statement read before Ms Justice Leonie Reynolds in the High Court on Thursday, James Carney apologised about posts he had made arising out of the sale of Sensational Sema, of which he was part owner

 

The part owner of a horse sold in 2011 has apologised before the High Court to bloodstock sales firm Goffs for making “defamatory posts” on social media about the company.

In a statement read before Ms Justice Leonie Reynolds on Thursday, James Carney apologised about posts he made arising out of the sale in 2011 of a horse, Sensational Sema, in which he had an interest.

Mr Carney accepted the posts he made were without any basis, undertook not to repeat such conduct in the future, and withdrew complaints he made about Goffs and related entities to professional bodies including the British Horseracing Authority.

Robert J Goff and Co, Goffs Bloodstock Sales Ltd, Goffs UK Ltd and Henry Beeby, chief executive of those firms, brought High Court proceedings against Mr Carney alleging defamation of Goffs in posts on various social media platforms and indirect representations he allegedly made to various bodies.

Damaging

Goffs said the allegations are untrue, defamatory and damaging to its reputation and sought damages, to include aggravated damages, for defamation against Mr Carney, of Main Street, Arklow, Co Wicklow.

On Thursday, Rossa Fanning SC, with Gary Compton, for Goffs, told Ms Justice Reynolds the matter had been resolved between the parties on terms that counsel read to the court. It was agreed the court could make certain orders including that Mr Carney takes down or deletes all posts made by him on social media concerning the plaintiffs and the horse Sensational Sema where any wrongdoing is alleged.

It was also agreed Mr Carney would delete a certain account on Twitter, withdraw any complaints he had made to professional and regulatory bodies within the horse racing industry and not make any similar complaints concerning the plaintiffs in the future.

Mr Carney’s apology was read to the court by his counsel, Neal Flynn. The proceedings were adjourned by the judge with liberty to re-enter.