Man who feared Euro would ruin finances took his own life

Father of two became worried about bills and introduction of Euro in native Lithuania

A man who feared the Euro currency changeover would impact his finances took his own life, an inquest has heard

A man who feared the Euro currency changeover would impact his finances took his own life, an inquest has heard

 

A man who feared the Euro currency changeover would impact his finances took his own life, an inquest has heard.

Petras Martinkenas (39) from Lithuania but living at Shanliss Rd in Santry, Dublin, was found dead on January 7th last.

The father of two had become increasingly worried about loans and bills and was ‘getting upset’ about how the introduction of the Euro in his home country would affect his finances.

In a statement read out at Dublin Coroner’s Court, his wife Dena Martinkenas said he ‘worried about money all the time.’ Mr Martinkenas had moved to Ireland in 2004 and his wife followed in 2005. She moved home to Lithuania in 2012 with the couple’s two children to mind her elderly mother.

“Our plan was for Petras to move back in a year’s time. We planned to fix up our house [in Lithuania] and Petras stayed because he could earn more money in Ireland [to pay for the renovation],” Mrs Martinkenas said in her statement.

A mechanic at J&S McGrath haulage in Finglas, Mr Martinkenas “became very sensitive about money,” according to his wife.

“Everything was nearly done, Petras was coming home soon,” she said.

But from summer 2014, Mr Martinkenas’ behaviour began to change.

“He was worried about money, he was lonely in Ireland without me and the family. I told him it would all be okay,” Mrs Martinkenas said.

“He was worried about money to furnish the house and he was getting upset because the currency in Lithuania was changing to Euro and things were getting more expensive,” Mrs Martinkenas said.

He spent Christmas with his family in Lithuania and returned to Ireland on January 6th. He took his own life the following day. He was described at the inquest as a “very nice fella” by Niamh McGrath, who works in the office at J&S McGrath. “Anything you would need he would sort it out,” Miss McGrath said.

He was found dead by his friend and housemate Sergios Petroskina, from Latvia, who found a note written in Lithuanian on a desk in his room.

“I only understood the last line, it said sorry my neighbour.’

Coroner Dr Brian Farrell returned a verdict of suicide.