Defamation action against well-known Dublin GAA pub withdrawn

Rugby coach Patrick Young had told court allegation of headbutting ‘a total fabrication’

Amy Young, of Beaupark Crescent, Clongriffin, Donaghmede, Dublin and her brother-in-law Gary Young, manager of Gaffney’s pub in Fairview, leaving the Four Courts on Thursday. Ms Young’s husband Patrick had withdrawn his defamation case against Gaffney’s. Photograph: Collins Courts

Amy Young, of Beaupark Crescent, Clongriffin, Donaghmede, Dublin and her brother-in-law Gary Young, manager of Gaffney’s pub in Fairview, leaving the Four Courts on Thursday. Ms Young’s husband Patrick had withdrawn his defamation case against Gaffney’s. Photograph: Collins Courts

 

A defamation action against a well-known Dublin GAA pub has been withdrawn following discussions.

Rugby coach Patrick Young, of Beaupark Crescent, Clongriffin, Donaghmede, Dublin, had sued the owner of Gaffney’s pub in Fairview, close to Croke Park, where his brother, Gary, is manager and “a respected member of staff”, for damages of up to €75,000.

Patrick Young, a 39-year-old father of four, claimed he had been defamed by a member of Gaffney’s staff on 10th July, 2017.

He had told the Circuit Civil Court that on the 16th anniversary of his marriage to his wife, Amy, they both attended at Gaffney’s for a celebratory drink.

He told his barrister Niall Flynn that barman Mick Whelan had told both he and his wife they would not be served and that he, Patrick, was barred for life because he “had a beef” with Paul Gaffney.

Young said that when he refuted this Mr Whelan had told him he had called him, Whelan, names on an earlier occasion and he was barred. He said the remarks had been overheard by other customers and he and his wife left. He had never been advised by anyone that he was barred.

In cross-examination by barrister Frank Martin, for the publican, Young said his brother, Gary, had worked in Gaffney’s for 20 years and he had, himself, occasionally worked there.

Headbutt

He agreed with Mr Martin there had been “words” between himself and Paul Gaffney in the pub in 2012 but denied on that occasion having thrown his weight around and having been rude to customers.

He told Mr Martin, who appeared with Patrick F O’Reilly Solicitors, that if Paul Gaffney was to tell the court he, Young, had head butted a customer before trying to head butt Gaffney, it would be “a total fabrication”.

Young also denied he had told Gaffney during the 2012 incident he knew all about his financial affairs and some indebtedness Mr Gaffney had. He also denied having threatened Gaffney that he “would have a crew visit every Friday and put him out of business”.

When it was put to him that Paul Gaffney had said he never wanted to see him on his premises again and that he had responded by using foul language, Mr Young said: “All of this is untrue.”

Young also denied having, on the night of the alleged 2017 defamation, called barman Whelan “a prick” and “a bollox”. Mr Martin said the court would hear that these things had happened and that Mr Gaffney was entitled to bar him without reason if necessary.

Amy Young said she met Patrick on 10th July, 2000 in Gaffney’s and they married a year later. On every anniversary they would attend Gaffney’s and she would return the initial compliment by buying him a drink. She was shocked when Mr Whelan had refused to serve them.

A full denial and defence to the defamation claims had been entered on behalf of the defendants Vincent and Paul Gaffney, of Gaffney’s Pub, Fairview, Dublin.

When bar manager Gary Young took the oath, the proceedings were halted for five minutes, at the invitation of Mr Justice Raymond Groarke, to allow talks.

A short time later, Mr Flynn told the court that the brief adjournment had been helpful and the proceedings could be withdrawn without further order.