Zen out of 10 for Portobello three-bed with exotic back yard

Radically refurbished two-storey Victorian redbrick in Dublin 8 is asking €750,000

  • Address: 13 Oakfield Place, Porotbello, Dublin 8
  • Price: € 750,000
  • Agent: DNG
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Portobello, a popular place to live since the 18th century, came seriously into its own in Victorian times when an eruption of large and small redbrick houses attracted enduring middle- and working-class communities to the area. Portobello is enjoying another “moment”, as prices for moderately sized, extremely livable homes there continue to increase.

The architect vendors of 13 Oakfield Place bought their two-storey redbrick terraced home in 2009. They paid about €390,000, “good value at the time,” they agree, though it needed total refurbishment. It had an outside toilet and a fallen-in ground floor. They “gutted back to the four walls and roof, put a kitchen/diningroom and main, ensuite bedroom into a two-storey rear extension”.

They did a lot more, all of it stylish and practical for family living. Now, though they “love the house and the great area”, a growing family and desire for a garden means they’re selling to move out of town.

In a floor area of 108sq m (1,163sq ft) there are three bedrooms (one ensuite), two reception rooms, kitchen/diningroom, family bathroom and guest WC. Agent DNG’s €750,000 asking price is a far cry from the £7 and 10 shillings valuation put on Oakfield Place houses at the end of the 19th century.

Coup de grace

No 13’s coup de grace is the effective, Zen-like merging of the kitchen/diningroom into the courtyard-style patio via three large, sliding glass doors. White, ceramic tiles cover the entire area and a retractable awning makes it (almost) weatherproof. Tall bamboos lining the rear wall add a mildly exotic flourish and there is a concealed, decently sized shed.

The kitchen/diningroom is white and light-filled, with a wall of cubed storage spaces and large, hardwood worktop. The view from the hall through to the wall of bamboo gives a delightful trompe l’oeil effect.

A trio of cast-iron fireplaces (stripped back and good as new) were the only salvageable original features. The largest is in one of two front reception rooms, both with high ceilings and sash windows. The other two are in the front bedrooms, again with high ceilings and wooden floors. The main, rear bedroom has an angled window. The bathroom has a tunnel velux and clever glass tiling. Planning permission exists to add 25sq m at second floor level.

A look at nearby prices shows 35 Lombard Street West sold for €520,000 in  December 2016, 21 Longwood Avenue for €800,000 in August last year and 2 Warren Street for €452,000 just last month.