Fine Crampton corner house for €1.35m

Double-fronted, four-bed house in leafy Clonskeagh

 

In the 1930s a new estate with houses of varying sizes was built by the most celebrated builder of the day, Crampton, on a plot of land between Milltown and Clonskeagh. Earlier this year, a house on Maple Road, nine, sold for €3 million. Now another house on the road is on the market – very different in style and size but still set to be sought after such is the appeal of this leafy enclave.

Number 24 Maple Road will go to auction through Lisney on September 29th with an AMV of €1.35 million.

A corner house, on the Clonskeagh end of the road, number 24 was originally a three-bedroom semi with a garage. After renovation nearly 10 years ago, it is a double-fronted four-bedroom house with 210sq m (2,260sq ft) and with a high-quality interior finish. The red-brick is in walk-in condition.

Family-friendly

A previous owner applied for planning permission to build a house in the side garden which gives an idea of the potential the current owners were able to exploit. They used it to extend greatly to the side to create a very large family-friendly eat-in kitchen that opens into a family room. The other rooms off the hall include the original living room with its bay window, and a dining room that opens to the back garden. There’s also a sizeable utility room and a downstairs toilet.

The kitchen is Alno with DeBros marble worktops. Upstairs, the two-storey extension allowed for a changed layout and there are four double bedrooms, one with a good-sized shower-room en suite. The family bathroom was updated and enlarged and there is a laundry chute from this floor direct to the utility room downstairs

Garden and parking

The attic has been converted giving an extra 25sq m (269sq ft). Other features include solar panels and underfloor heating. The garden, relatively small perhaps to the size of the house – part patio, part lawn – is to the side and rear, and to the front is off-street parking.

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