Celeriac blossoms: Two ways to prepare Celeriac

This root, related to celery, is having a moment – try it as a rosti and as the basis for a tasting plate

Celeriac tasting plate – when nonvegetarians are ordering the vegetarian dishes, you know you’ve hit the mark, and that’s exactly what happens with this cracker

Celeriac tasting plate – when nonvegetarians are ordering the vegetarian dishes, you know you’ve hit the mark, and that’s exactly what happens with this cracker

 

VANESSA’S WAY... CELERIAC ROSTI WITH FLAT MUSHROOMS
The gnarly celeriac has captured the zeitgeist, being reinvented by chefs all over the world in imaginative and delicious ways, from peasant-style celeriac baked in barley and fermented hay here in Ireland, to maple roasted celeriac ice cream in New York.

Even devout carnivores are starting to pay attention.

For novice cooks, don’t judge a book by its cover. Pick up this ugly duckling root in the vegetable aisle. Its character is both light and creamy, and it makes a delicious soup when combined with stronger flavours such as bacon lardons, truffle oil or almonds.

For a comforting low carbohydrate alternative to potato, mash it with butter and Parmesan.

These celeriac rosti are great for brunch, when you can choose to top them with smoked salmon, black pudding or baked mushrooms.

GARY’S WAY... CELERIAC TASTING PLATE OF POACHED, REMOULADE AND PUREE, WITH CANDIED SPICED WALNUTS AND BEETROOT
Vegetarian cooking divides opinion among chefs. Most get in a tizzy when they have to adapt menus at the last minute, whether it be for vegetarians or vegans.

The one thing I will say is, it’s always better if a vegetarian gives a little notice ahead of arrival, and even more so if they are on a vegan diet.

A small bit of notice means I have time to purchase a few ingredients in order to give a vegetarian or vegan ample choice, just like our other guests.

This celeriac dish has been one of our most popular creations at the restaurant in recent years. When nonvegetarians are ordering the vegetarian dishes, you know you’ve hit the mark, and that’s exactly what happens with this cracker.

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