Which 1916 Rising sites matter most?

A team of researchers at UCD want your help in building an app to guide people around the most important sites of the 1916 Rising

Soldiers on Church Street in Dublin, Easter week 1916

Soldiers on Church Street in Dublin, Easter week 1916

 

A team of researchers from the School of Information and Communication Studies at UCD want to put your opinion at the heart of a new walking app that takes in the main locations of the 1916 Rising.

Designed as a walking tour that will include audio, images and stories about the sites of the Rising, it aims to retell the story of the Rising with the help of your perspective. Rather than ask a team of experts or curators to determine the order and prominance of sites in the app, the team behind it want the public to vote on their favourite or most important sites.

The visibility or status of a particular site is often determined by the historian or archivist explaining it. But a visitor’s opinion of a historical location can change or evolve according to their own life experience. Which is the most important site for you? Is it the GPO, Boland’s Mill or Sackville Street? Where do you begin your version of what happened Easter week 1916?

The team have drawn up a shortlist of 15 sites to choose from:

Abbey Street

The Four Courts

Jacob’s Biscuit factory

St Stephen’s Green

Boland’s Mill

The Royal (now Collins) Barracks

The Royal College of Surgeons

Dublin Castle

Trinity College

Liberty Hall

Church Street

Moore Street

Sackville Street

The GPO

Clanwilliam Street

The team want you to go to siteselection1916.net before Saturday October 31st and vote for your five favourite sites, allowing them to complete the walking tour app in a way that responds to your version of events. Funded in part by the Irish Research Council and the UCD Humanities Center, the app will be a free download for IoS and Android devices from April 2016.

For more see siteselection1916.net. Closing date: October 31st

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