Profits up by a third at Kerry Airport

Passenger numbers ahead by 9%

The Aer Lingus Kerry-Dublin route recorded growth of 12 per cent in 2018. Photograph : iStock

The Aer Lingus Kerry-Dublin route recorded growth of 12 per cent in 2018. Photograph : iStock

 

Profits grew by a third at Kerry Airport last year as passenger numbers climbed by 9 per cent, the airport’s annual report and accounts show.

Operating profit after taxation for 2018 of €966,056 was up 33 per cent on the €728,626 recorded in 2017. The facility is heavily reliant on State funding, both to subsidise the Dublin to Kerry route and to contribute towards operational and capital expenditure. As with other regional airports, it wouldn’t be profitable if either operational or capital funding was removed.

Total passenger numbers grew to 365,339, up from 335,480.

The subsidised and “critically important” Aer Lingus Kerry-Dublin route , operated by Stobart Air, recorded growth of 12 per cent and an average PLF (Passenger Load Factor) of close to 60 per cent for the year, supported by new higher capacity 70-seat aircraft.

Turnover at the airport increased from €6.34 million to €7.9 million, reflecting increased passenger-related revenues.

Car parking income at almost €400,000 was higher than gift shop sales of €388,300, the figures show.

Some €1.914 million was spent on capital projects during the year, including taxiway resurfacing, navigation aids upgrades and additional airside equipment. This came with the support of funding from the Department of Transport, Tourism & Sport.

London flight

Ryanair’s service to London-Luton performed well, but the long established German route to Frankfurt-Hahn saw a small drop in its numbers. A second German link set up in 2018 – the Ryanair Kerry-Berlin service – also performed solidly, recording 32,518 passengers handled in the first full year of operation.

Kerry Airport chairman Denis Cregan described the the results as satisfactory.

The airport, which recently became the helicopter base for oil and gas exploration rigs moving into the Porcupine Basin in Kerry, celebrates 50 years in operation this August.