Next ups forecast on stronger sales

 

Clothing retailer Next nudged its full-year profit forecast higher today as it reported a rise in sales in the run-up to Christmas along with better margins.

Kicking off the post-Christmas retail reporting season for listed companies, Next, which has a long standing policy of never going on sale before Christmas, said it expected a year to
end-January 2013 pretax profit of £611-£625 million (€750-€768 million). Its previous guidance was £590-£620 million.

"Although sales have been in line with our expectations, cost control measures, markdowns and gross margins have all been slightly better than expected," the firm said.

With Britain facing the prospect of a triple-dip recession, many retailers have been finding the going tough as consumers fret over job security and a squeeze on incomes.

Next has generally defied the gloom, helped by its strong online offer, a constant stream of new store openings and diversification into homewares and overseas markets.

Next said total sales, excluding VAT sales tax, rose 3.9 per cent in the November 1st to December 24th period.

That compares with an increase of 2.7 per cent in its third quarter, giving a year to date rise of 3.9 per cent - in line with guidance of 3.0 to 4.5 per cent.

Sales at Next's over 500 stores in the UK and Ireland rose 0.8 per cent in the November, December period while sales at the Directory home shopping business increased 11.2 per cent. The firm said its post-Christmas Sale had started well.

Next forecast earnings per share growth for the 2012-13 year of 14-17 per cent, partly reflecting £241 million of share purchases. For the 2013-14 year the firm guided to sales growth of 1.5-4.0 per cent, with profit up in line with sales and a further £250 million of share buy backs.

"We think it is unlikely there will be any dramatic change in the consumer environment in the year ahead," it added. Shares in Next, up 38 per cent over the last year, closed yesterday at 3,772 pence, valuing the business at £6.08 billion.

Reuters

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