Minister for Education Richard Bruton is due to bring an Amendment to school admissions legislation to Cabinet on Tuesday. Photograph: Gareth Chaney/Collins

The Government is bracing itself for potential legal challenges for plans to remove the “baptism barrier” in school entry which are due to be publishe(...)

Under the new rules, pupils who opt out of religious education can choose alternative subjects. Photograph: Getty

Pupils in State-run secondary schools are to be given the option of opting out of religious instruction and studying alternative subjects on an annual(...)

The blueprint on the structure and time allocation for a redeveloped primary school curriculum represents some of the biggest proposed changes to teaching and learning at primary level in over 20 years

Catholic groups have expressed concern that proposed reforms to the primary curriculum could “undermine and downgrade” religion in schools. Under pro(...)

The very fact that non-Catholics arrogantly expect the same treatment as everybody else is a challenge to the whole concept of faith-based medicine. Photograph: iStock

I have a modest proposal to help ease the terrible congestion in our A&E departments. Patients turning up at Catholic hospitals should be required(...)

The Association of Trustees of Catholic Schools says  proposals will seriously undermine the role of Catholic schools and their ability to continue to promote a “living faith environment”.

Should taxpayer-funded schools be permitted to give priority in their admission policies to children of their own religion ahead of other children who(...)

The Association of Trustees of Catholic Schools says the proposals to remove the Baptism barrier will seriously undermine the role of Catholic schools and their ability to continue to promote a ‘living faith environment’.

Catholic groups have told the Government that plans to remove the “Baptism barrier” for entry to school will create major constitutional problems and (...)

Today, one in 10 of the population has no religion. More than one in three people in some parts of the State – such as Dublin City, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown and Galway – are non-Catholic.

Parents, in theory, have a constitutional right to opt their children out of religion instruction classes in schools. The reality is often different.(...)

Secretary general of the Department of Education Seán Ó Foghlú  said “there is an obligation to enrol regardless of faith tradition or none.”Photograph: The Irish Times

Community and comprehensive schools under Catholic patronage need to be prepared for a time when religious instruction and worship may not be required(...)