Zlatan Ibrahimovic: Mings ‘jumped into my elbow’

Bournemouth player appeared to stamp on the Swede’s head before elbowing incident

Manchester United’s Zlatan Ibrahimovic and Bournemouth’s Tyrone Mings are spoken to by referee Kevin Friend. Photo: Andrew Yates/Reuters

Manchester United’s Zlatan Ibrahimovic and Bournemouth’s Tyrone Mings are spoken to by referee Kevin Friend. Photo: Andrew Yates/Reuters

 

Manchester United striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic claimed Tyrone Mings jumped “into my elbow” and the Bournemouth defender denied deliberately stamping on the Swedish star’s head during a 1-1 draw at Old Trafford.

Ibrahimovic’s penalty miss and United’s inability to defeat a Cherries side that played 45 minutes with 10 men were overshadowed by incidents that resulted in no immediate punishment for either Ibrahimovic or Mings.

However the Football Association may apply retrospective action should referee Kevin Friend’s match report include references to those moments.

Mings stood on Ibrahimovic moments before the 35-year-old’s elbow struck the Bournemouth centre-back’s head. The second incident prompted Andrew Surman to shove Ibrahimovic over, resulting in his dismissal, once referee Friend eventually realised he was brandishing a second yellow card at the Bournemouth midfielder.

Surman may not be the only player to serve a suspension following this, yet both Ibrahimovic — who saw Artur Boruc save his 71st-minute penalty — and Mings denied intending to hurt the other.

“Listen, what happens on the field stays on the field,” Ibrahimovic told BBC Sport.

“I’m not someone who attacks someone off the field. You have the TV, you can see the images. I jump up and jump high and he (Mings) jumps into my elbow.

“It is not my intention to hurt someone. I didn’t know about the stamping on the head, if it was him it was him.”

Mings and Ibrahimovic clash

Mings also sought to absolve himself of any blame.

Asked by Sky Sports if he purposely stamped, Mings said: “Not at all, I would never do that. That’s not in my game. Hard and fair is how I like to tackle but off-the-ball stuff like that isn’t in my game.

“He (Ibrahimovic) is who he is, he’s a good player, he’s a physical player. I knew what sort of battle I was going to be in for coming here. And that’s what we had all day, it was a battle.

“There was maybe an elbow when the ball came in after, I didn’t see it, I felt it. But what happened after that with Surman getting sent off, I didn’t see it.”

However, pundit Thierry Henry suggested there was intent from Mings. And United captain Wayne Rooney, who was next to the pair when it occurred, believes the Bournemouth defender should be punished.

“I don’t think the referee saw Tyrone Mings try and stamp on Zlatan’s head,” Rooney said.

“To try and stamp on a player’s head is wrong, there’s no place for it. I’m sure there will be punishment after the game.”

It all detracted from what else happened at Old Trafford, where Marcos Rojo’s opener was cancelled out by Joshua King’s penalty after Phil Jones had fouled Marc Pugh. Boruc later saved Ibrahimovic’s spot-kick after Adam Smith was adjudged to have handled.

Unlike Rooney, United boss Jose Mourinho would not be drawn on Mings’ stamp, arguing instead that Friend “was very good” in correctly awarding the two penalties.

“Zlatan is a big man, like I am. Too many years in football,” Mourinho said.

“We are not the kind of generation that goes to the media and cries about what happened.

“We are from that generation of street football and football for big guys. So what happens, happens. Game over. What counts is the result and nothing else matters for us.”

The result ended a run of six straight wins in all competitions for United and represented a seventh home Premier League draw, with Bournemouth joining Burnley, Stoke and Hull in taking something from Old Trafford.

“The reality is that we are losing too many points at home,” Mourinho said.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.