Manchester United set to be without David De Gea and Paul Pogba for Liverpool game

Midfielder still struggling with ankle problem while goalkeeper was injured on international duty

 Spain goalkeeper David De Gea picked up an injury  in the  Euro 2020 Group F  match against Sweden in  Stockholm. Photograph: Anders Wiklund/EPA/TT

Spain goalkeeper David De Gea picked up an injury in the Euro 2020 Group F match against Sweden in Stockholm. Photograph: Anders Wiklund/EPA/TT

 

Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba has been ruled out of Sunday’s Premier League clash with Liverpool while goalkeeper David De Gea faces a scan and is a major injury doubt.

Pogba has been battling an ankle problem and United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjær confirmed that the 26-year-old has suffered a setback in his recovery.

Solskjær told Sky Sports: “Paul had an injury, he came back, he worked really hard. He came back and played a couple of games, maybe played through the pain barrier.

“He had a scan after the Arsenal game and maybe needed a few weeks’ rest in a boot so hopefully he won’t be too long, but he won’t make this game, no.”

De Gea was forced off in Spain’s Euro 2020 qualifier against Sweden on Tuesday night with a groin injury and Solskjær admits he is also likely to miss the Liverpool clash at Old Trafford.

“I think he’ll be out. It certainly looked like it anyway judging on last night so it’s just one of those things,” Solskjær added.

United sit 12th and are 15 points adrift of fierce rivals and league leaders Liverpool ahead of Sunday’s showdown.

Solskjær was battling a lengthy injury list before the international break and De Gea’s issue further adds to those problems.

But the Norwegian is hopeful Aaron Wan-Bissaka and Anthony Martial may be fit to play some role at Old Trafford.

“I can’t tell you 100 per cent [who] is going to be fit as something might happen,” he added.

“But hopefully Aaron and Anthony will last the training this week and be available for selection. If it’s for half a game or 30 minutes I don’t know but let’s see where they’re at.”

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