Eoin Morgan retires hurt after nasty blow to the helmet

When Dubliner headed for the pavilion England were 22 for three against Australia

England’s Eoin Morgan after being struck by Australia’s Mitchell Starc. Photograph: Philip Brown/Reuters

England’s Eoin Morgan after being struck by Australia’s Mitchell Starc. Photograph: Philip Brown/Reuters

 

England captain Eoin Morgan retired hurt in the deciding one-day international against Australia after suffering a nasty blow to the helmet.

Morgan was facing his sixth ball of the innings when he turned his head on a 90mph Mitchell Starc bouncer, which pranged sickeningly into the side of his helmet.

The 29-year-old remained on his feet for a couple of minutes before retreating to the turf when England’s medical team arrived in the middle.

After assessing the batsman it became immediately clear he was groggy and unable to resume his innings and he walked slowly from the field to a round of applause from the Emirates Old Trafford crowd.

Starc, who played in the match where Phillip Hughes died after being hit by a bouncer, was sought out by Australia head coach Darren Lehmann, who made his way to the boundary edge to talk to the left-armer before departing with a pat on the shoulder.

Morgan was only at the crease due to a top-order collapse in the Royal London series decider.

Jason Roy fell in the first over after he failed to review a dreadful lbw decision in Starc’s favour before John Hastings claimed a quick double strike.

He was fortunate to pick up Alex Hales, whose poor run continued when he threaded a wide delivery straight to Glenn Maxwell, who juggled a simple catch at backward point.

James Taylor was next out for 12 when he went to force Hastings into the off-side and feathered an edge to wicketkeeper Matthew Wade.

When Morgan headed for the pavilion, with no guarantee he would return, England were 22 for three and in need of a major partnership.

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