Fitzgerald says latest murder an ‘attack on law and order’

Fianna Fáil calls for increased Garda resources to tackle gangland crime

Gardaí at the scene of a fatal shooting on North Cumberland Street in Dublin on Tuesday. Photograph: Collins

Gardaí at the scene of a fatal shooting on North Cumberland Street in Dublin on Tuesday. Photograph: Collins

 

Tánaiste and Minister for Justice Frances Fitzgerald has said the latest murder in Dublin is an “outrageous attack on law and order” and is “unacceptable”.

Ms Fitzgerald said there has been “no scaling back” in Garda operations to tackle criminal gangs, adding that resources are being made available.

“We will continue to provide all necessary resources to provide high visibility policing to reassure communities, including extensive armed checkpoints across the city,” Ms Fitzgerald said.

“There has been absolutely no scaling back in these operations, nor will there be as long as these outrages threaten public order in this country.”

She said she “utterly” condemned the latest shooting.

“This unprecedented cycle of evil, cold-blooded violence must stop and the Government and gardaí stand with the community in the north inner city.

“Last week I met locals in the north inner city and saw and heard the effect this violence is having on their lives, and also the amazing work they are doing.

“These ruthless gangs intent on violence and revenge have no place in any community in this country and they will not be tolerated.

“We are confronting this and will see those involved brought to justice.

“Major investigations are underway in relation to recent shooting incidents and every necessary resource is available to An Garda Síochána. ”

President Michael D Higgins said he was concerned to learn of the latest gangland murder.

“It is very important that we say and do nothing that does other than to urge those involved to cease this terrible loss of life,” he said.

“Any murder is a great loss to any society and community. Obviously it is a matter for appropriate authorities and those investigating those issues to do so and I am sure they have the support of the public.”

More resources

Fianna Fáil earlier said the latest killing shows the Garda force needs further resources to tackle gangland crime.

Dublin Bay South TD Jim O’Callaghan, the party’s justice spokesman, said residents of the capital city need to “see the battle against these criminal gangs intensified to prevent further attacks like the ones we saw this morning”.

Mr O’Callaghan said murders were continuing despite condemnations from Ms Fitzgerald and promises to crack down on organised crime.

“Today we saw a shooting in broad daylight, just minutes’ walking distance from our city’s main thoroughfare.

“Fianna Fáil is repeating our party’s call for a new Serious and Organised Crime Unit to be established with a remit to include co-operation with Interpol and other police agencies. This unit, if adequately resourced, could spearhead the fight against these crime gangs.

“This shooting is shocking - but unfortunately is not surprising. It is not acceptable that this brutality is taking place on the streets of our capital.

“Over the last few months we have seen a spate of gangland killings dominate the media, beginning with the callous shooting in the Regency Hotel in Whitehall. ”

Community groups in Dublin’s north inner city also condemned the shooting.

In a joint statement, the Inner City Organisations Network, the Northeast Inner City Community Policing Forum, Young People at Risk, and the North Inner City Drugs Task Force said: “We utterly condemn this appalling shooting . . . . in the heart of our community.

“It is a tragedy for this young man’s family and friends. It is further trauma for an already frightened and vulnerable community.

“We are calling on the Tánaiste and Minister for Justice, Frances Fitzgerald, for firm and urgent action to end this senseless cycle of violence.”

The Green Party called on the Taoiseach to appoint a minister with responsibility for Dublin to help tackle the issue and accused the new Government of prioritising the policing needs of rural communities ahead of the capital.