Timetable of John Delaney loan controversy

Extraordinary scenes as Delaney reads a statement and refuses to answer questions

A screengrab taken from Oireachtas TV of FAI executive vice-president John Delaney before the Joint Committee on Sport. Photograph: PA

A screengrab taken from Oireachtas TV of FAI executive vice-president John Delaney before the Joint Committee on Sport. Photograph: PA

 

Saturday, March 16th: Football Association of Ireland (FAI) chief executive John Delaney seeks a High Court injunction to stop The Sunday Times publishing details of a €100,000 cheque wrote to the association in 2017.

He claimed details of the cheque could only have come from family court proceedings and should not be published.

Judge Anthony Barr refused to grant an injunction. On Saturday night, Mr Delaney issued a statement describing the €100,000 payment as a short-term loan to aid the association because of a cash flow problem. The statement says the loan was paid back in full in June 2017.

Sunday, March 17th: The Sunday Times publishes details of the cheque. The FAI issues a more detailed statement in response saying it has undertaken a governance review which included changes to the FAI board structure.

Tuesday, March 19th: Sport Ireland, which provides €2.7 million in funding to the FAI every year, requests urgent clarification from the board of the FAI about the loan and its repayment. Sport Ireland noted it had not been informed of the FAI’s precarious financial position as it should have been.

Saturday, March 23rd: Ireland beat Gibraltar 1-0 away from home in their first match in the Euro 2020 qualification campaign. Immediately afterwards, the FAI issues a statement revealing Mr Delaney has stepped down as chief executive and has been appointed as executive vice-president of the Association with responsibility for dealing with Uefa and Fifa.

Sunday, March 24th: The Sunday Times publishes further details about John Delaney’s remuneration package. Along with earning €360,000 a year, the FAI paid his €3,000 monthly rent over a long period of time. The FAI announces that Mr Delaney’s new position will pay a lot less than his previous one.

Tuesday, March 26th: Irish fans voice their disapproval of what is happening in the FAI by throwing tennis balls on to the pitch during the Euro2020 qualifier at the Aviva Stadium between Ireland and Georgia.

Wednesday, April 3rd: Sport Ireland chief executive John Treacy appears in front of the Oireachtas Committee on Tourism, Transport and Sport. He is not impressed by the failure of the FAI to issue an explanation for the €100,000 loan. He declines to voice confidence in the board of the FAI on three different occasions.

Monday, April 8th: The FAI admits to misleading statements about €100,000 ‘loan’ and said comments it made did not accurately reflect the board’s level of awareness. The association says it has accountancy firm Grant Thornton onsite to review its “books, records and ledgers”.

Wednesday, April 10th: Extraordinary scenes at the Oireachtas Committee on Sport as John Delaney reads a prepared statement and then refuses to answer any questions about the €100,000 cheque or his 13 years as FAI chief executive.

The association’s honorary treasurer Eddie Murray states that the FAI has only one bank account. It subsequently emerges the FAI has 24. Committee chair Fergus O’Dowd calls on Mr Delaney and the rest of the FAI board to step down.

Friday April 12th: Talks begin in the FAI over the loan controversy and Mr Delaney’s future with the organisation. The FAI’s chief sponsor says it regards good corporate governance as being of the “upmost importance”.

Saturday, April 13th: A friend of Mr Delaney claims he has offered to step down from the FAI but will continue his Uefa role. It is understood this offer to step down will be considered by the FAI board on Monday.

Sunday, April 14th: The Sunday Times reports on Mr Delaney’s spending on his work credit card in the final six months of 2016.