HSE to consider family’s concerns for Portiuncula inquiry

Review deals with 2014 cases but late Amber Reilly suffered oxygen deprivation at hospital in 2010

An  inquiry will cover the delivery of seven oxygen-deprived babies at Portiuncula Hospital last year, two of whom died.  File photograph: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

An inquiry will cover the delivery of seven oxygen-deprived babies at Portiuncula Hospital last year, two of whom died. File photograph: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

 

The HSE says issues raised by the Reilly family would be taken “fully into account” in drafting the terms of reference of an inquiry into problem deliveries into Portiuncula Hospital.

Warren Reilly, whose daughter Amber died a week after being born in Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe in February 2010, met Dr Pat Nash, chief clinical director of Saolta University Health Care Group this week.

The inquiry will cover the delivery of seven oxygen-deprived babies at the hospital last year, two of whom died.

A statement from the hospital and healthcare group said draft terms of reference were currently being considered by the original seven families identified.

“Families affected will be consulted fully and the findings of any reviews will be made available to the families,” it said.

“Portiuncula Hospital Ballinasloe-Saolta University Health Care Group is satisfied that there is no continuing patient safety concern arising from the issues identified.

‘Enhanced monitoring’

“There have been no negative perinatal outcomes at Portiuncula Hospital Ballinasloe since the enhanced monitoring measures were put in place.”

It said “an additional” four of the families would be met next week.

The statement said if the terms of reference are to be extended to include more families, the draft would be shared with them in advance of publication.

Mr Reilly and his wife Lorraine have campaigned for a widening of the inquiry.

He said they were told their case did not fit the criteria for the inquiry.

Disputing this, Mr Reilly pointed out Amber’s case was similar to the 2014 cases because it involved oxygen deprivation during labour, a failure to read CTG trace monitoring equipment correctly and the incorrect administration of drugs to manage labour.