Man says home’s value fell €90,000 after trees cut down

Company manager tells court neighbour felled seven 50-ft trees without permission

Dermot P McArdle told the Circuit Civil Court that in September 2015 he had been trying to sell his property on Kilgobbin Road, Stepaside, Dublin, and had been shocked to find his next-door neighbour Colin Kilgannon had carried out the tree felling. File photograph: Frank Miller/The Irish Times

Dermot P McArdle told the Circuit Civil Court that in September 2015 he had been trying to sell his property on Kilgobbin Road, Stepaside, Dublin, and had been shocked to find his next-door neighbour Colin Kilgannon had carried out the tree felling. File photograph: Frank Miller/The Irish Times

 

A Dublin company manager has told a court the value of his home fell by €90,000 after a neighbour cut down seven 50-feet high trees close to their common boundary and strongly trimmed back four others.

Dermot P McArdle told the Circuit Civil Court that in September 2015 he had been trying to sell his property on Kilgobbin Road, Stepaside, Dublin, and had been shocked to find his next-door neighbour Colin Kilgannon had carried out the tree felling.

Mr McArdle told his barrister Andrew Walker that he and his wife, Margo, had been living at a different address at the time and had been unaware of Mr Kilgannon’s plans.

He said that before the incident his property had been valued at nearly €900,000, but a last purchase offer had shown the property valuation had been reduced to €810,000.

Mr Kilgannon claimed Mr McArdle had given him permission to cut down the trees, the roots of which were underlying his property and causing damage to his house foundations. Mr McArdle denied having granted such permission.

Surveyor’s map

Barrister Angus Buttanshaw, counsel for Mr Kilgannon and his wife, Jelena, told Judge Raymond Groarke, that according to a surveyor’s map the trees were on Mr Kilgannon’s property.

Mr McArdle told the court that in 1968 he had planted the trees on his property. The Kilgannons had bought the house next door in December 2014.

There had been talks between Mr McArdle and Mr Kilgannon last September about removal of the trees. Mr McArdle denied having given Mr Kilgannon permission to cut down the trees and had told Mr Kilgannon, that since he was selling the house, Mr Kilgannon might have to deal with new neighbours.

Mr Kilgannon said his wife was seven months pregnant at the time and was very distressed about the trees causing damage to their house. The court heard that after Mr McArdle allegedly agreed to the trees being removed, Mr Kilgannon went and cut them down himself.

The case continues.