One of Christie’s finest plots . . .

Agatha Christie’s former Chelsea home for sale for €2.6 million

 

Agatha Christie wasn’t just a prolific writer of murder mysteries, she was also a prolific property developer and “a real wheeler dealer” with an extensive portfolio, says Spencer Cushing of John D Wood & Co, the selling agents for the double-fronted Chelsea mews that was one of her first properties. She lived at 22 Cresswell Place in SW10 in the late 1920s and her time living there is believed to have inspired her short story Murder in the Mews, published in 1937.

The house, which has changed hands numerous times since Christie owned it, is currently on the market asking €2.6 million. It was one of the author’s first development projects and involved converting the old stables of a large nearby house into a fashionable mews. She later added an extra storey to accommodate her writing room.

The writing room, which looks oddly perched on top of the house and is now used as a bedroom, has a westerly view across the gardens of what is arguably London’s most expensive street of houses, The Boltons. Christie bought 22 Cresswell Place while still in her 20s and lived there for several years before letting it. According to Cushing, the layout is the same as when she lived there and the four-bed house still has the parquet flooring she installed downstairs.

It was last on the market two years ago when four parties submitted sealed bids and was bought “for considerably more than it’s on the market for now,” says Cushing.

Currently in “fair condition”, the house has a quaint olde-world look and “a lovely feel” and was last refurbished 17 years ago, when it was owned by an Italian couple.

Christie lived here during the roaring 20s and it’s highly likely the mews was the setting for a few parties.

“She was a complex character and it was the era of The Great Gatsby and a decade of enjoyment and I think she fulfilled her part in that very well,” says Cushing.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.