Painting of O’Donovan brothers to go under the hammer

Auctions in Cork have an oil-on-canvas of Rio heroes and a silver tray carrying IRA history

 

Two unconnected items at separate auctions in Cork have a “silver” theme. A painting titled Gary and Paul at the Olympics, estimated at €500-€700, is among the lots in Skibbereen-based Morgan O’Driscoll Auctioneers’s online art sale for which bidding ends on Monday evening (November 7th).

The oil-on-canvas painting by artist Charles Mountjoy depicts West Cork brothers Gary and Paul O’Donovan competing at this summer’s Rio Olympics where they won silver in the lightweight double sculls rowing final.

For further information about the auction, and to register for bidding, see morganodriscoll.com

Silver tray

Separately, Woodward Auctioneers of Cook Street in Cork will hold its “Bi-Annual Auction of Irish & English Silver” on Saturday, November 19th.

Among the lots is a silver tray inscribed “Presented to Major General J E Dalton, by his brother officers IRA engaged with him on active service in Cork on the occasion of his marriage Cork 1922”.

James Emmet Dalton won the Military Cross with the British Army in the first World War and later returned to Ireland and joined the IRA.

He became a leading figure in the War of Independence and was a close friend and comrade-in-arms of Michael Collins. He was also present when Collins was killed in Béal na Bláth in August 1922.

Film industry

Dalton survived and got married in Cork three months later. The tray was presented to him by his fellow soldiers at a reception in the Imperial Hotel.

In later life, Dalton made a career in the film industry and founded the Ardmore Studios in Bray. He died in 1978 and was buried close to Collins in Glasnevin Cemetery.

Auctioneer Tom Woodward said the tray had been consigned to the auction by a family descendant and has an estimate of €6,000-€8,000. The tray was made in 1903 by Dublin silversmith Charles Lamb. It measures 62cm by 44cm and is decorated with flowers and shamrocks with pierced borders and oval handles.

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