Two ways to cook... rhubarb

A taste sensation pudding inspired by grandma, and a chutney to serve with pork and bok choy.

To finish, slice the pork tenderloin and serve with a spoonful of the chutney and a piece of the bok choy.

To finish, slice the pork tenderloin and serve with a spoonful of the chutney and a piece of the bok choy.

 

GARY’S WAY...

PORK WITH RHUBARB & GINGER CHUTNEY, GRILLED BOK CHOY

Rhubarb, for most people, is an ingredient that should find itself in crumbles, cakes, tarts and other desserts, but I love to use it as an accompaniment to savoury dishes, or juiced, turned into a syrup, and used as the foundation flavour in a wee sneaky rhubarb cocktail.

One thing we’ll all agree on, though, is its versatility and incredible flavour.

It’s very easy to grow and handles our moody weather, so if you don’t have a crop, stick it on your list of things to sow when the time is right.

Here, I’ve paired it with a beautiful pork tenderloin and charred gingery bok choy.

Gary's Pork with rhubarb & ginger chutney, grilled bok choy

VANESSA’S WAY...

RHUBARB EVE’S PUDDING

What is it about fruit desserts that reminds us of our grannies? Despite the allure of chocolate on menus, I’ll usually opt for the tartness of an apple or rhubarb dessert, with a dollop of lightly whipped cream.

My grandma was a fine lady, living through wartime, and ran our house with military precision when she came to stay and mind her five grandchildren.

Respectability, and dinner at six, were her mantras. Her repertoire of desserts have provided me with lasting inspiration when whipping up pudding for my own kids. One of her regulars was Eve’s Pudding, traditionally made with a base of apples stewing while a Victoria sponge mixture cooks on top.

I love making it with rhubarb, which when stewed often yields lots of extra liquid. This, when mixed with sugar, reminds me of a popular post-war syrup called Delrosa which my grandma allowed us to drizzle over ice-cream – it’s a taste sensation.

Vanessa's Rubarb Eve's Pudding

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