School’s nearly out so celebrate with honey flapjacks

Lilly Higgins: On rainy days these can be thrown together in no time

Flapjack bars can also be crumbled up to make a decadent honey-kissed granola

Flapjack bars can also be crumbled up to make a decadent honey-kissed granola

 

I’m so delighted that the school summer holidays are almost here. Even though only one of my little ones is in primary school I feel like it has been a long stretch since they were all last lazing at home with nowhere to rush to.

Although a morning spent at playschool is not the most taxing I can tell they are tired and in need of recharging with rays of warming sunshine. So we are all looking forward to slow starts in the morning, more hanging around the house and sitting in the garden just watching birds or butterflies.

I use honey to sweeten these but maple syrup will work just as well

Enjoying a longer stretch in the day means that they will need some handy snacks to sustain them so I’ve started to make reliable flapjacks. Even though I make these for school quite often they seem to eat them at home more than in their lunchbox.

I use honey to sweeten these but maple syrup will work just as well. Oats are renowned for their slow release of energy, making this a perfect mid-morning or afternoon snack. I usually add any seeds or nuts that are in the house. Chia seeds and linseed are both great as they both have gelatinous qualities so they help bind the mixture together as it bakes. They are both highly nutritious too. Brazil nuts, hazelnut or pecans (especially if you use maple syrup) all taste great in these bars.

Drizzling the chocolate over afterwards is the perfect job to give a four-year-old

I love adding a few tablespoons of cacao nibs too for a healthy chocolate-chip twist. A drizzle of good quality dark chocolate or a handful of sprinkles is just enough to guarantee small kids that these are well worth trying.

On rainy days these can be thrown together in no time. Children from age two upwards are able to help in the kitchen once they understand basic rules and can follow directions. This recipe involves weighing out, mixing, stirring and the all-important pressing down of the mixture before it bakes. This can all be done with parental guidance and plenty of patience. Drizzling the chocolate over afterwards is the perfect job to give a four-year-old.

These flapjack bars can also be crumbled up to make a decadent honey-kissed granola.

Honey flapjacks: makes eight to 10 bars:

  • 125g honey;
  • 75g butter or coconut oil;
  • 1 tbsp smooth peanut or almond butter;
  • 250g of oats;
  • 50g sunflower seeds;
  • 3 tbsp sesame seeds;
  • 3 tbsp whole chia seeds;
  • 80g dark chocolate, roughly chopped.

Preheat the oven to 180C. Butter and line an 8ins square tin with parchment paper.

Gently melt the honey, butter or coconut oil and nut butter together in a pan over a medium heat. Stir till well combined and smooth.

Press the mixture firmly into the prepared tin. Bake for 25-30 minutes until lightly golden

Place the oats, seeds and any additional extras into a large bowl. Create a well in the centre and pour in the warm honey mix. Stir well with a wooden spoon to combine.

Press the mixture firmly into the prepared tin. Bake for 25-30 minutes until lightly golden.

Leave to cool for half an hour before placing in the freezer to cool down further and it will be easier to slice neatly. I usually leave it in there while I’m melting the chocolate, about 10-15 minutes.

Leave to set before storing in an airtight container

Melt the chocolate in a heat proof bowl over a pan of simmering water. Leave to cool slightly. Remove the flapjacks from the freezer and tip onto a board lined with greaseproof paper. Slice neatly into 8-10 bars and use a spoon to drizzle with the chocolate. Leave to set before storing in an airtight container. I usually keep mine in the fridge for up to a week.

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