Rubio and the GOP stuck in own ‘Groundhog Day’

Not all politicians spout canned answers that bear little or no relationship to reality

Hillary Clinton is a genuine policy wonk, who can think on her feet and clearly knows what she is talking about on many issues. Photograph: Patrick T Fallon/Bloomberg

Hillary Clinton is a genuine policy wonk, who can think on her feet and clearly knows what she is talking about on many issues. Photograph: Patrick T Fallon/Bloomberg

 

By now everyone who follows politics knows about Marco Rubio’s software-glitch performance in Saturday’s Republican debate. (I’d say broken-record performance, but that would be showing my age.)

Not only did he respond to a challenge from Chris Christie about his lack of achievements by repeating, verbatim, the same line from his stump speech he had used a moment earlier; when Christie mocked his canned delivery, he repeated the same line yet again.

Last week – on Groundhog Day, to be precise – Republicans in the House of Representatives cast what everyone knew was a purely symbolic, substance-free vote to repeal Obamacare. It was the 63rd time they’ve done so.

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Rubio’s inability to do anything besides repeat canned talking points was startling. Worse, it was funny, which means that it has gone viral. And it reinforced the narrative that he is nothing but an empty suit. But really, isn’t everyone in his party doing pretty much the same thing, if not so conspicuously?

The truth is that the whole GOP seems stuck in a time loop, saying and doing the same things over and over. And, unlike Bill Murray’s character in the movie Groundhog Day, Republicans show no sign of learning anything from experience.

Think about the doctrines every Republican politician now needs to endorse, on pain of excommunication.

First, there’s the ritual denunciation of Obamacare as a terrible, very bad, no-good, job-killing law. Did I mention that it kills jobs? Strange to say, this line hasn’t changed at all despite the fact that we’ve gained 5.7 million private-sector jobs since January 2014, which is when the Affordable Care Act went into full effect.

Then there’s the assertion that taxing the rich has terrible effects on economic growth, and conversely that tax cuts at the top can be counted on to produce an economic miracle.

This doctrine was tested more than two decades ago, when Bill Clinton raised tax rates on high incomes; Republicans predicted disaster, but what we got was the economy’s best run since the 1960s. It was tested again when George W Bush cut taxes on the wealthy; Republicans predicted a “Bush boom”, but actually got a lacklustre expansion followed by the worst slump since the Great Depression. And it got tested a third time after president Barack Obama won re-election, and tax rates at the top went up substantially; since then we’ve gained eight million private-sector jobs.

Budget crisis

But Republican faith in tax cuts as a universal economic elixir has, if anything, grown stronger, with Rubio, in particular, promising to eliminate all taxes on capital gains.

Meanwhile, on foreign policy the required GOP position has become one of utter confidence in the effectiveness of military force. How did that work in Iraq? Never mind: The only reason anybody in the world fails to do exactly what America wants must be because our leadership is lily-livered if not treasonous. And diplomacy, no matter how successful, is denounced as appeasement.

The shared Republican stance on foreign policy is basically the same view Richard Hofstadter famously described in his essay “The Paranoid Style in American Politics”: Whenever America fails to impose its will on the rest of the world, it must be because it has been betrayed. The John Birch Society has won the war for the party’s soul.

But don’t all politicians spout canned answers that bear little relationship to reality? No. Like her or not, Hillary Clinton is a genuine policy wonk, who can think on her feet and clearly knows what she is talking about on many issues. Bernie Sanders is much more of a one-note candidate, but at least his signature issue – rising inequality and the effects of money on politics – reflects real concerns. When you revisit Democratic debates after what went down Saturday, it doesn’t feel as if you’re watching a different party, it feels as if you’ve entered a different intellectual and moral universe.

Foxification

Whatever the ultimate reason, however, the point is that while Rubio did indeed make a fool of himself on Saturday, he wasn’t the only person on that stage spouting canned talking points that are divorced from reality. They all were, even if the other candidates managed to avoid repeating themselves word for word. – (Copyright The New York Times 2016)

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