Central Bank’s economic warning, Pathfinder’s buyout and timber shortages

Business Today: the best news, analysis and comment from The Irish Times business desk

Mark Cassidy, director of economics and statistics at the Central Bank of Ireland. “The path ahead for the economy will depend on the path of the virus, which makes the strength of the recovery and the future impact on sectors uncertain,” he says in the Central Bank’s latest quarterly analysis of the Irish economy.  Photograph:  James Forde for the Irish Times

Mark Cassidy, director of economics and statistics at the Central Bank of Ireland. “The path ahead for the economy will depend on the path of the virus, which makes the strength of the recovery and the future impact on sectors uncertain,” he says in the Central Bank’s latest quarterly analysis of the Irish economy. Photograph: James Forde for the Irish Times

 

The Central Bank of Ireland has warned it will take until 2022 for the economy to rebound from the Covid-19coronavirus pandemic. And that’s provided there is a gradual reopening of the economy this year and no resurgence of the virus. Eoin Burke-Kennedy reports on this gloomy analysis.

Global management consultancy Sia Partners has bought Irish consulting group Pathfinder and says it plans to more than double the size of the business over the next three years with the addition of up to 60 staff. Mark Paul has the details.

The Republic is poised to rebound at a faster pace than most from the Covid-19 slump, even as the crisis may prompt countries to rethink how they secure goods and services, according the head of Citigroup’s European operations. Joe Brennan spoke to the bank.

The most severe phase of the hit to service businesses from Covid-19 has passed, according to data from AIB, which shows a sector that is beginning to stabilise after the chaos resulting from the pandemic. Peter Hamilton examines the data.

In his weekly column, John FitzGerald looks at the latest round of changes to Government departments following the formation of the new coalition, and how such changes can often be counter productive to the efficient workings of the civil service.

In Agenda, Barry O’Halloran explains how vast swathes of trees are waiting to be felled in the Republic, but a bureaucratic tangle risks leaving them in the ground and threatening the supply of a vital housebuilding material as well as thousands of jobs.

In Wild Geese, Dubliner Jay Galligan explains why he has made his home in Bristol, his involvement in a “top secret” car project for Dyson, and a new role he has taken up.

In out work feature, Olive Keogh looks at the new phenomenon of hybrid working. It’s where people no longer work from one place, but from several – their office, their home and another location, such as a local co-working space.

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