Ministers told not to attend Taiwan national day events

Government says taking part in celebrations could provoke strong reaction from China

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen at her inauguration in Taipei in  May.  Taiwan celebrates what it calls its National Day on October 10th. Ireland does not maintain diplomatic relations with Taiwan. Photograph: Ashley Pon/Getty Images

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen at her inauguration in Taipei in May. Taiwan celebrates what it calls its National Day on October 10th. Ireland does not maintain diplomatic relations with Taiwan. Photograph: Ashley Pon/Getty Images

 

Government Ministers have been advised not to attend any celebrations marking the Taiwanese national day.

The Department of Foreign Affairs has issued strong advice to Ministers to resist all invitations to mark the occasion.

In an email, the department said their attendance would be contrary to Government policy.

Ireland recognises the government of the People’s Republic of China as the sole legitimate government of China.

Ireland does not maintain diplomatic relations with Taiwan and there is no inter-governmental contact between the two sides.

The island of Taiwan celebrates what it calls its National Day on October 10th.

Every year the Taipei Representative Office issues invitations to attend an event to mark the occasion around this time of year.

In an email to all Government Ministers, the department said any attendance could provoke a strong reaction from China.

“Meetings between Irish and Taiwan public representatives are perceived in China as implicit recognition of the government of Taiwan and thus breach the One China Policy which has been adhered to by successive Irish governments,” it said.

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“Any resumption of these events would place further strain upon the relationship and could provoke a strong negative response from China.”