Average of 14 bikes stolen a day in Dublin, says cycling group

Not having proper lock main reason for theft with over 4,950 bikes stolen in 2014

A study found 66 per cent of thefts were from bikes with cable locks or “sub-standard locks”.Photograph: Alan Betson / The Irish Times

A study found 66 per cent of thefts were from bikes with cable locks or “sub-standard locks”.Photograph: Alan Betson / The Irish Times

 

Not having a proper bicycle lock is one the main reasons an average of 14 bicycles are stolen every day in Dublin, according to a bike theft group.

Lord Mayor Críona Ní Dhálaigh launched the campaign to combat bike theft in the city, which has risen 167 per cent since 2008.

The bike to work scheme was introduced the following year.

The group, which was set up by Dublin City Council, said 4,950 bikes were reported stolen in Dublin in 2014.

A survey taken by Dublin Cycling Campaign that year found 66 per cent of thefts were from bikes with cable locks or “sub-standard locks”.

Lord Mayor Críona Ní Dhálaigh, who launched the campaign on Monday, said it was vital cycling was supported in the city.

“Alerting cyclists to the need to use higher quality locks is important. We need to make it harder for bikes to be stolen,” she said.

David Timoney from Dublin Cycling Campaign said College Green, Dame Street, Parnell Street and roads at the back of St Stephen’s Green were the top areas for bicycle thefts according to the survey in 2014.

Inspector Liam Geraghty said although some of the bike thefts were committed by organised gangs, most were “low level”.

“There’s a huge amount of opportunistic thefts. Some of it is very simply walking by, seeing the bike unlocked and walking away with the bike,” he said.

“There is some element of organised bike theft around for high value bikes but the majority are fairly low level.”

Insp Geraghty said it was important people asked questions to a seller for proof of ownership when buying a second-hand bike.

He said it was “disappointing” only 10 per cent of people had their bike frame serial number when they reported their bike stolen.

“It’s a common thing everybody should have. We recover hundreds of bikes every year and we can’t find their owners,” he said.

The bike security campaign recommended that cyclists use U-locks with the “sold secure” accreditation as their main lock.

The bike theft working group was set-up earlier this year to tackle the growing problem of bike theft in the city.

It has representatives from An Garda Síochána, the National Transport Authority, Dublin Cycling Campaign, bike shops and Dublin City Council.

NTA programme manager Cormac Ross said it funded a Bicycle Parking study with DCC during 2015.

“With the significant increase in cyclists in Dublin in recent years, bike theft has become a more serious issue,” he said.

Action taken from the study included an increase in on-street parking around the city and the expansion of off-street parking at Drury Street and other areas.

For tips to prevent your bike being stolen go to www.dublincycling.ie