State deporting man allegedly involved with Isis

Lawyers of man accused of being Islamic State’s main recruiter here attempt to stop process

The man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was taken into custody hours after the High Court refused on Monday to allow him bring his case to the Court of Appeal. File photograph: Collins Courts

The man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was taken into custody hours after the High Court refused on Monday to allow him bring his case to the Court of Appeal. File photograph: Collins Courts

 

The process of deporting a man to Jordan whom the State believes is involved in Islamic terrorism began on Monday night as his legal team pursues last-ditch efforts to stop it going ahead.

The man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was taken into custody hours after the High Court refused on Monday evening to allow him bring his case to the Court of Appeal.

Kevin Winters, of KRW Law, Belfast, said an application was made to the European Court of Human Rights on Monday, after it had been learned that the man had been taken into custody, in an effort to secure an interim injunction against the deportation. However word was received from the court on Tuesday that it is not prepared to intervene.

The man’s legal team is now trying to get the Supreme Court to sit later to hear an application.

It is understood that the man is in Cloverhill Prison.

‘Foremost organiser’

The State has alleged that the man is the main recruiter in Ireland for Islamic State, also known as Isis, and the “foremost organiser and facilitator of travel by extremists prepared to undertake violent action” on behalf of Islamic State.

The man has said it is not the case that he had consulted with senior extremist leaders outside Ireland or recruits members for the terrorist organisation.

He claims he was tortured in Jordan before and fears being tortured there again if he is deported.

Last month Mr Justice Richard Humphreys dismissed the man’s application to prevent his deportation. He said the man had failed to persuade the Minister for Justice and Equality “either of the veracity of his account of previous ill treatment or of a real risk of future ill treatment”.