Move to extend Thomas McFeely’s bankruptcy by five years

Priory Hall developer accused of not disclosing all of his assets

Thomas McFeely: was adjudicated bankrupt in Ireland by the High Court in July 2012 and that bankruptcy is due to expire shortly. Photograph: Collins Courts

Thomas McFeely: was adjudicated bankrupt in Ireland by the High Court in July 2012 and that bankruptcy is due to expire shortly. Photograph: Collins Courts

 

A bid to extend for five years the bankruptcy of Priory Hall developer Thomas McFeely has been initiated at the High Court on grounds including alleged failure to disclose all his assets.

The application for such an extension, made by the official administering the developer’s bankruptcy, is almost unprecedented in the High Court.

Mr McFeely (67) was adjudicated bankrupt in Ireland by the High Court in July 2012 and that bankruptcy is due to expire shortly.

The developer was previously adjudicated bankrupt in England and Wales by a London court but that decision was rescinded after a woman owed €100,000 by companies of Mr McFeely brought proceedings here.

At the High Court, Bernard Dunleavy SC, for Chris Lehane, the court appointed official admisintering the bankruptcy, said his client was seeking a five year extension over non co-operation of Mr McFeely with the bankruptcy and failure to disclose assets.

Counsel told Ms Justice Caroline Costello they were seeking various service orders now as a matter of urgency because the bankruptcy is due to expire soon and his client was unsure of the exact whereabouts of Mr McFeely.

Mr McFeely is believed to be in Northern Ireland and had provided a contact address at Claudy, Co Derry, believed to be his parents’ former home, but was not residing there, counsel said.

The main orders being sought were orders allowing Mr Lehane serve notice of the application to extend the bankruptcy on Mr McFeely at the Claudy address and also via email addresses and addresses of solicitors for Mr McFeely.

The judge said she was satisfied it was appropriate to make orders permitting the proceedings be served in most, but not all, of the various forms sought by Mr Lehane.

When adjudicating Mr McFeely bankrupt in July 2012, the High Court noted he has substantial debts here, including €200m in the National Assets Management Agency (Nama).