Geoghegan shot while crouching on ground, inquest told

Coroner’s court hears rugby player received five gunshot wounds to head and body

Shane Geoghegan was shot dead  as he walked home from work in a case of mistaken identity.

Shane Geoghegan was shot dead as he walked home from work in a case of mistaken identity.

 

An inquest into the death of rugby player Shane Geoghegan today has recorded a verdict of murder.

Limerick Coroner’s Court heard medical evidence the 28-year-old received a total of five gunshot wounds to the head and body as he walked home from a friend’s house on November 9th, 2008.

Coroner Dr Timothy Casey read details of a postmortem report by State Pathologist Dr Marie Cassidy, which indicated Mr Geoghegan received initial gunshot wounds from behind.

Later wounds indicated he was crouching down and then lying on the ground, facing his attacker.

Members of the Geoghegan family, including Shane’s mother Mary, his girlfriend Jenna Barry and aunt Margaret Walsh, were present at the court.

Dr Casey said the results indicated that two of the wounds sustained - to the head and lungs - would have been potentially fatal.

In a sitting lasting less than 20 minutes, the jury recorded a unanimous verdict that the cause of Mr Geoghegan’s death was murder.

Dr Casey, repesentatives of the Garda and the jury extended their sympathies to the Geoghegan family.

Mr Geoghegan’s mother Mary thanked members of the force and emergency services for their help and support.

Last month, John Dundon, the leader of a Limerick-based criminal gang, was sentenced to life in prison for organising Mr Geoghegan’s murder.

The Special Criminal Court head Mr Geoghegan was the victim of a shooting intended for another man, named as John “Pitchfork” McNamara, who lived near him at Clonmore.

The court ruled that evidence in Dundon’s trial pointed “overwhelmingly” to his guilt in directing and organising the murder.

Dundon’s carelessness in describing the real target to a member of his gang, Barry Doyle, was one of the reasons behind the mistaken identification, the court heard.

Mr Doyle is also serving a life sentence for the murder.

Evidence from April Collins, the former partner of Mr Dundon’s brother, proved crucial in securing his conviction.