Deadly serious about bringing New York bagels to Dublin

Food File: Ciarán Hyland of Deadly Bagel; Dr Coy’s new recipe bouillon; Cream of the Crop ice-cream

Deadly Bagel. Photograph: Chris Maddaloni

Deadly Bagel. Photograph: Chris Maddaloni

 

“These are the best bagels I’ve had in years. They are properly cooked to be chewy and dense, with generous toppings. My family is from New York, and the search for bagels is a kind of religious quest – these are the real deal. The flavours on offer are authentically New York.”

That glowing acknowledgement, from Chris Maddaloni, head of video at this newspaper, is for Deadly Bagel, set up in February by Ciarán Hyland. Hyland is a trained chef, who graduated from DIT’s culinary arts degrees course in 2016 and subsequently worked in kitchens in Dublin, Melbourne and Auckland.

He now works in the tourism industry, in a non-cooking capacity, but once a week, on Saturdays, he bakes a variety of bagels at Hour Kitchen in Churchtown. You can order them at deadly-bagel.clickandcollection.com, for collection at Couple of Coffees, behind the Two Sisters Pub in Terenure, Dublin 6W, or for delivery to addresses in Dublin 4, 6, 6W, 12, 14 and parts of Dublin 8.

“I love great NY-style bagels, and having visited there twice in the year pre-Covid, decided to bring them home to Dublin,” Hyland says. “Deadly Bagels are handmade the traditional way – overnight proof, hand-shaped, boiled, topped, baked – with no shortcuts. We use the best Irish ingredients such as Glenstal butter, Olly’s Farm Raw Honey and Hegarty’s Templegall cheese.”

Ciarán Hyland of Deadly Bagel. Photograph: Chris Maddaloni
Ciarán Hyland of Deadly Bagel. Photograph: Chris Maddaloni

Stocking up on ingredients

Dr Coy’s organic vegetable bouillon has had an ingredients upgrade. There are now 23 rather than 18 vegetables and herbs, and sea salt, in the formulation. As well as turning into a flavoursome stock once dissolved in boiled water, the dehydrated blend can be mixed with butter and rubbed into chicken before roasting, added to rice, cous cous and grains, and used as a sprinkle-on seasoning. It’s widely stocked in healthfood shops and independent food stores.

An organic vegetarian stock option.

Sustainable scoops

Cream of the Crop, the ice-cream made from surplus food that would otherwise become waste, has expanded. The company, set up by Brazilian chef Giselle Makinde last September, originally operated from her home in Portmarnock, but has now moved into a 1,600sq ft production base in Dublin 8. Makinde, who came to Ireland with her family in 2018, expects to turn up to seven tonnes of food, saved from landfill, into ice-cream this year.

Giselle Makinde, founder of Cream of the Crop ice-creams. Photograph: Kamyla Abreu
Giselle Makinde, founder of Cream of the Crop ice-creams. Photograph: Kamyla Abreu

The flavours Makinde makes depend on what’s available at any given time, but recent hits have included peanut butter and coffee gelato with quinoa granola; roasted banana and peanut butter gelato; bread and butter pudding gelato, and pineapple and mint sorbet.

Wherever possible, the gelatos and sorbets are made using 100 per cent of the fruit or vegetable, skins included. “Now I’ll be able to use new techniques like dehydrating to make use of and transform vegetable and fruit skins into powders to be added to my gelatos,” Makinde says of the move into her new base.

Cream of the Crop products can be ordered online at creamofthecropgelato.com, for collection, or twice-weekly delivery to Dublin, Kildare, Meath and Wicklow.

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