Light Ballet to transform skies and landscapes along River Shannon this week

The moving installation, with a soundscape by David Kitt, will travel through eight counties

Light Ballet: the installation at Lough Key, in Boyle, Co Roscommon. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire

Light Ballet: the installation at Lough Key, in Boyle, Co Roscommon. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire

 

Light Ballet, a moving light installation, is to transform skies and the surrounding landscapes of eight Irish counties as part of Brightening Air, a nationwide festival to mark the reopening of the arts sector.

Launching on Monday and running until June 20th, Light Ballet will float down almost 200km of the River Shannon over eight days, visible from up to seven kilometres away.

The journey begins each night from dusk, at about 10.15pm, starting in Co Roscommon on June 13th and travelling through Cos Leitrim, Longford, Offaly, Westmeath, Tipperary and Clare before ending its journey in Co Galway.

The Light Ballet light installation at Lough Key in Boyle, Co Roscommon. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire
Light Ballet on Lough Key, in Co Roscommon. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire
Lighting designer Matthew McCloskey watches from a rib as The Light Ballet light installation begins its eight-day journey along the River Shannon at Lough Key in Boyle, Co Roscommon on Monday. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire
Lighting designer Matthew McCloskey watches as Light Ballet begins its eight-day journey along the River Shannon. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire
People watching the Light Ballet light installation in Boyle, Co Roscommon on Monday. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire
Light Ballet will be accessible online as well as along the Shannon. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire

Created by the Irish light artist Mick Murray and lighting designer Matthew Cregan, the installation is accompanied by a newly composed soundscape by David Kitt. Kitt says that his soundscape, which uses an Irish musical time signature mixed with words from the poet Nidhi Zak/Aria Eipe and his own vocal, will bring the audience on a journey through river, “spirit land” and the surrounds.

The artwork will run on a seven-minute cycle for four hours each night, meaning the full show cycle can be seen at any point along the route. Audiences can also catch the installation and soundscape, which are synchronised, through their phones, tablets or computers, on Brightening Air/Coiscéim Coiligh and Culture Works websites. – PA

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