Patrick Kavanagh

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Illustration: Dearbhla Kelly

On a tour of Ireland, one might easily ask: where are the women? There are statues to a few (we counted just five), a smattering of commemorative plaq(...)

There was something quintessentially Dublin about the fact that, after many years of lobbying for the erection of a statue to commemorate Luke Kelly in his native city, two were unveiled on the same day this week. Photograph: Paul Kelly

There was something quintessentially Dublin about the fact that, after many years of lobbying for the erection of a statue to commemorate Luke Kelly i(...)

Ross McQuade, left, Richard Henry, Conor Yorke and Padraig Fallon in O’Neill’s

Ten years ago I was a law student at UCD, and the city which had become my second home was about to be snatched away from under my feet. I wasn’t very(...)

The Luke Kelly statue by Dublin artist Vera Klute is lowered into place on Sherrif Street in Dublin. Photograph:  Paul Kelly

You wait years for a Luke Kelly statue, and then two of them come along at once. Tomorrow, the city unveils two separate sculptures, on either side of(...)

“The reader is a computerised female American, so there are unintentionally humorous results when she encounters Irish place-names or other eccentricities.” Photograph: iStock

Googling a Yeats poem the other day, I chanced on a website, poemhunter.com, that not only displays the text but also reads it for you, uninvited. Th(...)

At least sometimes, the folk cures had roots in biology or chemistry

Further to the subject of cures, which we were discussing yesterday, Wicklow-born reader Mattie Lennon reminds me that certain Irish families used to (...)

Mourners at the funeral of Eileen Battersby in Drogheda at St Peter’s Church, Drogheda, Co Louth.  Photograph: Donall Farmer

Literary critic, author and journalist Eileen Battersby was a “brilliant”, “beguiling”, “beautiful”, “courageous”, “dynamic” romantic who lived by her(...)

Patrick Kavanagh went into Hodges Figgis and started to throw books around the shop in a rage that  The Green Fool  was not in the window. Photograph: The Wiltshire Collection, National Library of Ireland

Patrick Kavanagh went on the rampage in 1938 when his childhood memoir The Green Fool was not stocked in the window of some of Dublin’s best known boo(...)

‘Like me, the lad from England had a big interest in both Patrick Kavanagh and Flann O’Brien (above)’.

In Dublin on Friday night, I stepped into a thronged O’Neill’s Pub on Suffolk Street in hopes of watching Ulster’s European Rugby Cup match. It was a (...)

“Turkey money” was long a staple of Irish rural life in general, a well-timed seasonal supplement to whatever else could be earned on a farm during the year.

To most people now, a “cleaver” is a deadly instrument, typically seen (you hope) in the hands of a butcher. But the word used to have another, very d(...)

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