Ireland will never have a better chance to beat Australia, says Ed Joyce

Kevin O’Brien misses Stormont fixture due to hamstring injury

Ed Joyce: “We’ve got an experienced side and I think if ever we have a chance of running Australia close or beating them then it’s going to be tomorrow.” Photograph: Inpho.

Ed Joyce: “We’ve got an experienced side and I think if ever we have a chance of running Australia close or beating them then it’s going to be tomorrow.” Photograph: Inpho.

 

Senior batsman Ed Joyce believes Ireland will never have a better chance to turn the tables on Australia as they prepare to take on the world champions at Stormont in today’s Hanley Energy Challenge One-Day International (10.45am).

Steven Smith leads the visiting side following Michael Clarke’s retirement after he bowed out of the one-day game following the demolition of New Zealand in the World Cup final back in March.

Ireland’s own World Cup campaign fell away after a promising start, while their form in the recent World Twenty20 qualifier was decidedly mixed, but Joyce is confident Ireland can cause a big shock.

“We’ve got an experienced side and I think if ever we have a chance of running Australia close or beating them then it’s going to be tomorrow,” said the Sussex player.

“It’s a little bit damp out there and it’ll be a good toss to win I think. They are a team in transition which means they’ll be hungry, but I think they’ll be quite nervous about the game also, or certainly some of their players will.”

One player who will miss out is all-rounder Kevin O’Brien, after he aggravated a hamstring injury he picked up in a recent club game. The Hills’ Max Sorensen comes back into the 13-strong squad for the game, while the other piece of team news saw coach John Bracewell giving Niall O’Brien a chance to reclaim the wicket-keeping duties as he takes over from Gary Wilson.

Smith announced Australia’s starting XI with Queensland opener Joe Burns making his debut.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.