Marian Keyes: ‘I don’t want to be remembered after I die’

The writer talks about the man who made her cry, why Danny DeVito would play her in the film of her life, and why she regrets getting married in a church

Marian Keyes: “We are only here for a nanosecond. All we are is dust on the breeze”

Marian Keyes: “We are only here for a nanosecond. All we are is dust on the breeze”

Marian Keyes was born in Limerick and lives in Dublin. She is one of the most successful Irish novelists of all time. Her books, which include WatermelonRachel’s HolidayThis Charming ManThe Mystery of Mercy CloseSaved by Cake and The Woman Who Stole My Life, have sold more than 20 million copies worldwide. When she is not writing, reading or upcycling furniture – known in Keyes parlance as “banjoing” – she can be found on Twitter interacting with her 100,000-plus followers. Her new book, Making it Up as I Go Along, is a hugely entertaining collection of nonfiction essays. She lives in Dún Laoghaire with her husband, Tony Baines.

First childhood memory?

I was 2½. Myself and my mother were in the kitchen and I was in this high chair that was also a car. She was taking down a holy plate off the wall, and the chip pan went on fire. I associated the two events: that she had interfered with God in some way and that we were being mildly smited. I remember her standing at the hob, smiling. I realise now she was smiling to keep me from panicking. She was very calm in the face of the terrifying chip-pan burning.

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