FAI chief Jonathan Hill in talks over equal pay for international players

At present men receive a match fee of €2,500 while women get €500

FAI chief executive Jonathan Hill photographed at Abbotstown ahead of the association’s agm on Sunday. Photograph: Tommy Dickson/Inpho

FAI chief executive Jonathan Hill photographed at Abbotstown ahead of the association’s agm on Sunday. Photograph: Tommy Dickson/Inpho

 

FAI chief executive Jonathan Hill, following a speech at the association’s annual general meeting that leaned heavily on addressing the gender imbalance in Irish football, has revealed that negotiations are currently taking place to bridge the pay gap for male and female Irish internationals.

Currently, the Republic of Ireland senior men’s international match fee is €2,500 while the women get €500.

“I think the approach that is used for men and women should be the same, yes,” said Hill. “In other words, we should have the same approach to tournament bonus and tournament qualification.

“The quantum that that approach might refer to is dependent on obviously the decisions of both Uefa and Fifa as to how much they are going to pay for those bonuses but, yes, we should strive to have equality in that approach.”

Considering Fifa’s prize-money for the 2018 men’s World Cup was €340 million while the prize-money for the 2019 women’s World Cup was €25.5 million, Hill was asked what is stopping the FAI from following the lead of the English FA, Norwegian and Brazilian football federations by paying the same match fee to men and women.

“I don’t think there is a specific barrier to that,” Hill responded. “I am having those conversations with both the representatives of the men’s and women’s team at the moment.”

The FAI are believed to be dealing with respective Ireland team captains Séamus Coleman and Katie McCabe.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.