Plus: Irish name-dropping in The Great Gatsby, the author of At Swim, Two Girls

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

Plus: Women’s Prize winner, following The Cow Book and who transalates Elena Ferrante’s novels into English?

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and roundup of the latest literary news

From Graham Norton's new novel to Mary McAleese’s memoir, here are our picks

Plus: Irish shortlisted, the letter in The Scarlet Letter, Graham Norton’s birthplace

The National Library of Ireland will be welcoming Dil Wickremasinghe to interview Louise O’Neill about her new book, After the Silence

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

The €100,000 award, sponsored by Dublin City Council, is the world’s most valuable annual prize for a single work of fiction published in English.

Nobel Prize, Women’s Prize, Giller Prize and US National Book Award winners shortlisted

Plus: 2020 International Booker Prize winner and the first names of Goethe, Maupassant and Cervantes

Eugene McCabe: “Having to leave would be a kind of death. That is why I plan to have my ashes spread in the ground of an early [7th century] Celtic church on the farm.” Photograph: Bobbie Hanvey

A quickfire interview from 2011 with the acclaimed author of Death and Nightingales

Eugene McCabe at home in Drumard, Co Monaghan. Photograph: Pat Langan

Acclaimed author of King of the Castle, Death and Nightingales and Troubles screenplays

Marieke Lucas Rijneveld, author of The Discomfort of Evening, and translator Michele Hutchison (left), who won the 2020 International Booker Prize

Debut novel inspired by brother's death makes Dutch writer, 29, youngest winner of translated fiction prize

Donal Ryan: ‘It’s a very personal book, a kind of oblique confrontation of loss and a celebration of familial love.’ Photograph: Alan Place

I felt they’d barely skimmed the books but were bitter about my ‘success’, says the novelist

Hazel Gaynor: Now, more than ever, it seems to me that the past is not a foreign country where people do things differently, but is a reassuringly familiar place, one from which we can draw comfort

Historical novelist Hazel Gaynor turned a family tragedy into an exploration of loss

 Cathy Sweeney:   shortlisted for the 2020 Butler Literary Award, along with her daughterr Lucy Sweeney Byrne; fellow short story writer Wendy Erskine; Ian Maleney; and Oisín Fagan. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

John Hume speaks to the press after the Stormont talks in 1998 that led to the Belfast Agreement. Photograph: Alan Betson

‘His extraordinary impact reflects the exceptional political leader and person he was’

John Hume in Derry in 1999. Photograph:  Bryan O’Brien

What John Hume meant to me: Irish writers, from Michael Longley to Lisa McGee, pay tribute

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Tom Vaughan-Lawlor as Nigel ‘Nidge’ Delaney in Love/Hate

From Nidge and Connell Waldron to Gretta Conroy, Rashers Tierney and Pegeen Mike

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

Colum McCann: longlisted for Apeirogon. Photograph: Jillian Freyer/New York Times

Hilary Mantel looks on course for Booker hat-trick with final part of Wolf Hall trilogy

Margaret Atwood and Bernardine Evaristo, joint winners of the 2019 Booker Prize.

There are several strong Irish contenders for this year’s prize

Test your literary knowledge with 12 questions for 12 months

Adrian McKinty: “Two years ago, I had given up on writing altogether and was working in a bar and driving an uber, and so to go from that to this is just amazing.”

Theakston Old Peculier award goes to a Belfast author for two years in a row

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and a round-up of the latest literary news

Olivia Kiernan: “Once I’m truly in my characters’ world and writing with some speed then longhand isn’t quick enough”

Olivia Kiernan on her latest novel, her writing life and the books she loves

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and a round-up of the latest literary news

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Sarah Gilmartin: “Awards like the Mairtín Crawford are great because they give you the impetus to write. The recognition  is good for the soul, and the money affords you time and space away from other work to persist with writing projects, to go deep into the draft.”

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the week’s literary news

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the week’s literary news

Niamh Campbell: “To be awarded the equivalent of a year’s salary for a single story is absurdly lucky, but I also feel glad I chased the dream because I feel fulfilled, at a soul level, as a person when I write professionally.”

A Q&A with This Happy author Niamh Campbell, winner of £30,000 short story prize

Maggie O’Farrell, Curtis Sittenfeld and Doireann Ní Ghríofa feature in our summer-friendly titles

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Colson Whitehead: ‘I lacked the imagination to conceive of how terrible Trump would be.’ Photograph: Simone Padovani/Awakening/Getty

The winner of two Pulitzer prizes on the exhausting task of writing about racism

Adrian Duncan: “I am very moved and proud to be awarded this wonderful book prize. To be associated with John McGahern, a writer I have admired for so long, is an incredible honour.” Photograph: Sean Breithaupt

Colm Tóibín praises ‘pitch perfect debut’ Love Notes from a German Building Site

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Domhnall O’Donoghue: Years ago, when I battled an insatiable desire to be liked by everyone, I quipped that I’d only truly make it in life when I had a stalker! Crazy For You is how I imagine that fantasy playing out.

Ros na Rún star Domhnall O’Donoghue on the influences that fed into his new novel

The weekly quiz ... 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Christine Dwyer Hickey: “Writing a novel takes a big chunk of one’s life – The Narrow Land was six years 	in the making – which is why I really, really appreciate this recognition.”

This year’s Dublin One City One Book author wins for novel about artists Edward and Jo Hopper

Clockwise from left: Niamh Campbell, Louise Kennedy, Daniel O’Malley, Shawn Vestal , Alexia Tolas and Namwali Serpell, shortlisted for the Sunday Times Audible Short Story Award

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

Are you on first-name terms with authors and characters? 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Niamh O’Donnell, the new director of Poetry Ireland. Photograph: Ste Murray

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a round-up of the latest literary news

Dominic Cummings: subject of a new satire by Arthur Mathews. Photograph: Will Oliver/EPA

Faber to release Arthur Mathews’s satire on controversial British government adviser

Fergal McNally: “I spend more of my life than I’d like to reading emails. Recently I opened one from The Caterpillar. Now all I want to do is write something that could make a reader feel half as happy as reading that email made me.”

Roger McGough chooses winning poem for children who ‘sometimes feel out-of-step with the world’

A still from Paddy Raff’s skit on the frustrations of hosting a family Zoom quiz.

A young Belfast comedian is taking social media by storm with his lockdown-life skits

Welcome to The Irish Times prize book quiz: 50 questions to test your literary knowledge

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

The winners will be revealed on June 20th when the festival was due to be taking place.

Dalkey Book Festival cancelled but prizes recognise Irish writing is having a moment

Louise Nealon: “I am looking forward to post-lockdown celebrations, but for now, I am dancing around my childhood bedroom in a Harry Potter dressing gown.”

Louise Nealon was spotted by top agent after her story was published in The Irish Times

“Billy O’Callaghan’s style is rich and sonorous, and he surveys his characters’ ageing bodies and dwindling horizons with a dauntless eye, yet with such compassion that the final effect is to enhance their dignity.”

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

 Máire Zepf, the first Children’s Writing Fellow at Queen’s Univerity Belfast and Seamus Heaney Centre, has won the Book of the Year Award for her  verse novel Nóinín

Máire Zepf, Sarah Crossan, Ashling Lindsay, Kim Sharkey and Meg Grehan honoured

Sheila Forsey is an honours graduate from Maynooth in creative writing. The Secret of Eveline House is published by Poolbeg Press

‘I have a ritual of making tea, lighting a candle and then I am gone into my fictional world’

Leonard and Hungry Paul author Rónán Hession

A preview of Saturday’s pages; Pigott Poetry Prize; BAIS prize; Trócaire Poetry Ireland competition; ILFD podcasts; Cruinniú na nÓ(...)

An interview with author Richard Ford is one of the highlights of this Saturday’s books coverage in The Irish Times. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a round-up of the latest literary news

Marie Cassidy: “I have witnessed death in all its guises. This book is an attempt to enable you to see with my eyes, to walk carefully in my footprints beyond the police tape.” Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

A preview of Saturday’s books pages

Prof Luke O’Neill, head of immunology at Trinity College Dublin, said: “This book is a fantastic resource for children, and explains the Coronavirus in a colourful and calming way. Adults will learn a thing or two, too”

Gill Books download ‘explains the coronavirus in a colourful and calming way’

Damen O’Brien: “Sometimes you have to give up on your favourites, but sometimes it is worth ignoring the feedback and sticking with your gut. I am glad I did with this poem.”

Judge Claudia Rankine explains why she chose Australian poet Damen O’Brien

 Eavan Boland in Dublin in July 2018: “Our devastation at the loss of Eavan Boland will be tempered by profound gratitude for what she gave us and what she left us,”  writes Paula Meehan. Photograph: Barry Cronin

‘I will cherish her exemplary life for the rest of my own life’

Eavan Boland:  one of Ireland’s foremost poets

Poet, who returned last month from teaching at Stanford University, suffered a stroke

Isabel Galleymore has won the 2020 John Pollard International Poetry Prize for her debut book Significant Other

A preview of Saturday’s books coverage and a roundup of this week’s literary news

The shortlist for the 2020 Women’s Prize for Fiction

Jenny Offill, Natalie Haynes and Angie Cruz also in running for £30,000 prize

Nicola Pierce: “I first read The Diary of Anne Frank.  as a teenager and it was hugely inspiring to discover a book written by a 15-year-old. “ Photograph: City Headshots Dublin

Nicola Pierce Q&A: ‘You will never be lonely as long as you have a book in your hand’

Vinny Byrne packing books for delivery at Charlie Byrne’s Bookshop in The Cornstore at Middle Street in Galway city. Photograph: Joe O’Shaughnessy

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of literary news

Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick: “I thought I’d make a picture book based on the Táin but quickly realised that was daft – the legend is full of violence, death and sex.”

Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick reimagines the Táin as a tale of first love and teenage aggression

Stephen Sexton: lives in Belfast where he teaches at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry. Photograph: Michael Weir

A preview of tomorrow’s book pages

Helena Close: I heard a story about a mother who walked out on her family and couldn’t stop thinking about the effect that would have on her children

The author of The Gone Book on her writing life

Steve Cavanagh: “There’s a big trend toward high-concept, standalone psychological thrillers. Long may it continue – they’re usually great.”

The Belfast-based thriller writer on his new book, Fifty Fifty, and his literary loves

Seán Hewitt: will host a new weekly podcast, Unlaunched Books. Photograph: Bríd O’Donovan.

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

The six titles on the 2020 International Booker Prize shortlist

Translations from Spanish, German, Dutch, Farsi and Japanese up for £50,000 prize

I want a list of books that are guaranteed to distract and entertain me, that will  put a smile back on my face, that might even make me laugh out loud. Photograph: Getty Images

No, I don’t want to read about the plague. I want to smile, laugh even. These might help

Ruth Gilligan: I have this very vivid memory of finishing The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold and thinking “yep, I think I’d like to be a writer”. Photograph: Paul Musso, Hay Festival 2019

The Butchers author on her new novel set along the Border during the BSE crisis

Brigitte de Valk has been awarded the Cúirt New Writing Prize for Short Fiction for her story The Lobster.

A preview of Saturday’s books pages

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and the latest literary news

Christine Dwyer Hickey, Joseph O’Connor and Niall Williams up for historical fiction award

Author Michael Harding  at the Tyrone Guthrie Centre, Annaghmakerrig, Co Monaghan. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

Church of Sveti Jovan at Kaneo, Ohrid, North Macedonia. Photograph: Enrico Bottino/REDA&CO/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Brief reviews of The Revisionaries by A R Moxon and Maugherow: A Much Wilder Place

Bargain!

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and a round-up of the latest literary news

My nan once told me, “your mum’s out philandering”. She meant ‘gallivanting’. Photograph: Getty Images

Words don’t always mean what people think they mean. Just look at this Twitter conversation

2020 International Booker Prize: Dutch author Marieke Lucas Rijneveld has been longlisted for the as yet unpublished The Discomfort of Evening

Michel Houellebecq and Irish translator Shaun Whiteside up for £50,000 award

Laureate na nÓg Sarah Crossan won the Carnegie Medal  previously for One in 2016 and was shortlisted twice: for The Weight of Water in 2013 and Apple and Rain in 2015.  Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

The cast of Lisa McGee’s Channel 4 comedy Derry Girls: Nicola Coughlan, Jamie-Lee O’Donnell, Dylan Llewellyn, Louisa Clare Harland and Saoirse Monica Jackson

Katy Hayward’s Twitter account shortlisted for separate Ewart-Biggs prize on Brexit

Gavin McCrea: “I was bullied severely from the ages of 10 to 20, after which I left Ireland vowing never to return, and now I have and I am made revisit those old experiences”

Gang broke writer’s nose and cheekbone just after he had finished novel at UCD library

Stephen Fry, festival directors Sian Smyth and David McWilliams, Jony Ive and Bono at last year’s Dalkey Book Festival.  Photograph:  Conor McCabe

Festival marks second decade with €20,000 Novel of the Year and €10,000 Emerging Writer prizes

A portrait of Darran Anderson by Liz Seabrook

Listen to the author discuss what inspired his memoir of his family’s lives in Derry city

Yesterday’s Bookseed event at Dooradoyle Library in Limerick with writer and illustrator Mary Murphy. Photograph: Aingeala Flannery

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and details of the latest Irish Times Eason offer

Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill presents fellow poet Ailbhe Ní Ghearbhuigh with the “Parnell Stick”, which she had been given in turn by Seamus Heaney. Photograph Nick Bradshaw

A new report criticises our poetry coverage. We explore the issues and defend our record

A preview of Saturday’s books pages

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a round-up of the latest literary news

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

Sarah Moss, author and new creative writing assistant professor at UCD. Photograph:  Crispin Rodwell for The Irish Times

Sarah Moss, acclaimed author of Ghost Wall, talks about leaving Brexit behind to move to Ireland and teach in UCD

The latest book news and a sneak preview of Saturday’s books pages

Jonathan Coe: the judges called his 13th novel, Middle England, a scathingly comic portrayal of the social and family divisions that bedevil Brexit Britain, “the perfect novel for now”. Photograph: Getty Images

Jonathan Coe’s Middle England wins novel award as debut authors win three categories

A sneak preview of Saturday’s books pages

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris, a Holocaust love story based on a true story

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris is Ireland’s bestselling book for a second year

Caragh Maxwell: a second-year student at Sligo IT, her essay was the most popular article in Irish Times Books this year

A student’s moving essay on her body pipped Irish writers’ views on Brexit for first place

Diana Athill’s prose is luscious, her themes contemporary and the narrative will entertain the reader until the end. File photograph: Eamonn McCabe

Brief reviews of Don’t Look at Me Like That, The Manager’s Tale, Above Average at Games, Stories of the Sahara, Through Her Eyes a(...)

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