A scene from the 2018 animated short An Béal Bocht – The Poor Mouth, based on Flann O’Brien’s 1941 satirical novel (see question 10)

The weekly challenge: 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

A preview of Saturday’s books pages

Edna O’Brien, in Paris in Novembre 2019, where she received a special Prix Femina for her novel Girl. Photograph: Sophie Bassouls/Sygma via Getty Images

90-year-old author joins Bono and Heaney as Commandeur of Ordre des Arts et Lettres

Leo McKern as Horace Rumpole in the Thames Television series

The weekly challenge: 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Greg Delanty. Photograph: Brian MacDonald

A new poem by Greg Delanty

The weekly challenge: 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Conor O’Callaghan: ‘When I came back to Ireland in the late noughties, after the financial crash, I always felt like Oisín. All the shops closed down, and nobody around.’ Photograph: Niall Hartnett

In a powerful new novel, Conor O’Callaghan follows an emigrant’s road trip with his daughter

 Johnny Rogan  in Dublin in 2011. Photograph: Alan Betson

London Irish writer was famous for his attention to detail and clash with Morrissey

Liz Nugent: “Thank you so much, UCD L&H for such an honour. Imagine, James Joyce and me, hanging out.”

Saturday’s books pages; Literature Ireland podcasts; RoC longlist; BND Magazine; Between The Red Lines

The shortlisted books

Winner will be announced on March 24th

Ralph Fiennes in The Dig

The weekly challenge: 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

A production photograph from Rockaby by Samuel Beckett, par tof Trinity College Dublin’s latest acquisition

Eason book offer; TCD Beckett archive; Listowel deadline; HarperCollins appointment

Photograph: Patrick Semansky/AFP/Getty

The weekly challenge: 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Author Danielle McLaughlin at home near Donoughmore, Co Cork. Photograph: Michael Mac Sweeney/Provision

Cork writer on her heralded debut novel, self-doubt and writing with autism

Monique Roffey,  winner of the 2020 Costa Book of the Year for her novel, The Mermaid of Black Conch. Photograph: Ian Gavan/Getty Images

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

Cover stars: indie publishers recommend their books to watch out for in 2021

From an Irish coastal atlas to unsettling tales, civil war and Neil Jordan’s runaway slave

Denis McIntyre, director of Bram Stoker’s Castle Dracula museum and cinema in Clontarf, Dublin. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

The weekly challenge: 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

A roundup of the latest literary news and preview of Saturday’s books pages

Sally Rooney: The Normal People author’s third novel is due out in September

The weekly challenge: 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Laura-Blaise McDowell: on Costa story shortlist

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

Sally Rooney: the author's new novel will be published by Faber & Faber on September 7th. Photograph: Kalpesh Lathigra

Beautiful World, Where Are You follows Normal People and Conversations with Friends

The weekly challenge: 10 questions to test your literary knowledge

From Old Ireland in Colour: c.1946, Feothanach, Co. Kerry; Members of the O’Sullivan, Griffin and Kavanagh families; Photographer: Caoimhín Ó Danachair; Source: National Folklore Collection

The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse is overall bestseller

The late Eavan Boland  in Dublin in 2018. Photograph: Barry Cronin

Trinidadian authors Ingrid Persaud and Monique Roffey win novel awards

Some of the authors to look forward to in 2021: Ed O'Loughlin, Sinéad O’Connor, Lisa McInerney, Danielle McLaughlin, Neil Jordan, Claire Keegan, Conor O’Callaghan and  Keith Ridgway

A preview of this year’s most anticipated fiction, nonfiction and poetry

Plus: Michael Connelly’s smoothie lawyer and Michael Harding’s debut novel

A preview of tomorrow’s pages and round-up of the latest literary news

Edna O'Brien in her London home in 1999. Photograph: Frank Miller/The Irish Times

Writers pay tribute to one of Ireland’s greatest and most influential authors

Plus: Frank Ronan’s Irish Times winner and on first-name terms with Edna O’Brien

Seán O’Brien: warrior-like commitment. Photograph: Billy Stickland/Inpho

Brief reviews of Fuel by Seán O’Brien, and Deirdre Nuttall’s history of Irish Protestants

An Post Irish Book of the Year 2020: ‘I accept this award with deep gratitude to each and every one of you. Míle buíochas libh go léir,’ says Doireann Ní Ghríofa, author of A Ghost in the Throat. Photograph: Clare Keogh

‘I’m overjoyed,’ says poet Doireann Ní Ghríofa, who wins for her acclaimed prose debut

Also: Debuts by Marian Keyes and Conor McPherson, plus a novel of Roger Casement

Photograph: Moment/Getty

Roddy Doyle, Anne Enright, John Banville, Sarah Moss and others pick their favourites

Reese Witherspoon with Where the Crawdads Sing author Delia Owens. Photograph: @PutnamBooks

Delia Owens, Sally Rooney, Marian Keyes and Graham Norton all feature in top 10

Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin: “I don’t know what to do with the bottle, I want to do something to suggest that the relationship between poetry and alcohol does not need to be a destructive one. It seems it isn’t in China. Suggestions from the poets of Ireland would be welcome.”

Edna O’Brien 90th birthday lecture; Kit de Waal joins UL; Maggie O’Farrell honoured

John Banville: “I despise this ‘woke’ movement. Why were they asleep for so long? The same injustices were going on. It’s become a religious cult.”

Wide-ranging Hay Festival interview tackles crime fiction, religion and the Irish novel

Plus: 2020 Irish Book Award winners and a world war’s blockbuster chronicler

Hake bake: Photograph:  Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

When not cooking up their next book, Irish writers work their magic in the kitchen

Poet Stephen Sexton has been awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature 2020 for his first collection, If All the World and Love Were Young.

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

Donal Ryan: “Books, like all art, offer an escape route, however temporary, from the relentlessness of this year of fear and isolation, and I’m happy to have been able to offer some tiny break in the clouds for my readers.” Photograph: Clare Keogh

Donal Ryan, Doireann Ní Ghríofa, Graham Norton, Luke O’Neill and Dara McAnulty among winners

Plus: Booker’s 2020 victor, a Shane MacGwan bio, Dostoevsky’s last epic novel

Douglas Stuart: dedicated the book to his own mother, who died of alcoholism when he was 16.

Debut author is second Scot to win with very personal tale of poverty and addiction

Plus: Joseph O’Connor’s martyred poet and Oddest Title of the Year contenders

Maggie O’Farrell, author of Hamnet. Photograph: Murdo Macleod

A preview of Saturday’s pages and roundup of the latest literary news and events

Plus: Heaney’s rebel food, Maura Laverty’s saucy soap, a young author’s stir-fry

Classic reading for the lockdown

Sarah Moss, John Banville, Lisa McInerney, Joseph O’Connor and more on books that have stood the test of time

Plus: TS Eliot’s rebel fan, a spymaster at Slough House, Jürgen Klopp’s biographer

Sarah Gilmartin: “As a reviewer, I’ve been reading One debuts for years and I’m delighted to be published by an imprint with such a consistently high standard.”

A round-up of the latest literary news and a preview of tomorrow’s books pages

Plus: Literary Dublin winner, An Post nominees, Kafka and Stoppard’s birthplaces

Wendy Erskine: winner of the Butler Literary Award for Sweet Home

Shadowplay by Joseph O’Connor is tomorrow’s Irish Times Eason book offer

Catherine Ryan-Howard, Patrick Freyne, Anna Carey, Bernard Brogan, Ray D’Arcy, Ruth Medjber and Conor Ferguson, who have all been shortlisted for the 2020 An Post Irish Book Awards

Patrick Freyne, Dara McAnulty, Doireann Ní Ghríofa, Graham Norton, Keelin Shanley and Marian Keyes shortlisted

Plus: Abbey Theatre rejects, RTÉ’s Insurrection, an ‘elegant’ history of Brown Thomas

Elizabeth Boyle on her debut The Dark Age; Wonderfest; and Baillie Gifford Prize shortlist

Anakana Schfield: “Bina initially met resistance from UK and US publishers. After a review in The Irish Times of the Knopf Canada edition, Bina found a publisher – Fleet – in the UK and Ireland.” Photograph: Arabella Campbell

Vancouver-based author secured British publisher after review in The Irish Times

Plus: Louise Kennedy’s upcoming double header and John Banville’s old-school spy

The Temple House Vanishing by Rachel Donohue is Irish Times book offer at Eason

The 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature winner: American poet Louise Glück. Photograph: Shawn Thew/EPA

American writer receives award for ‘her unmistakable poetic voice’

Plus: Romeo’s original crush, a popular Scandi detective, the Barnes Booker

Derek Mahon at home in Kinsale, Co. Cork in 2010. Photograph: John Minihan

Michael Longley, ​​​​​​​Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Peter Fallon, Colm Tóibín, Vona Groarke, Colette Bryce and many more pay tribute

Dara McAnulty (16), author of Diary  of a Young Naturalist.

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

Plus: What was the first name of the Brontë sisters’ brother

Harshika Kaur, one of the winners of this year’s An Post and Children’s Books Ireland  Re-ImagineNation Competition.

A preview of Saturday’s pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

Plus: Irish name-dropping in The Great Gatsby, the author of At Swim, Two Girls

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

Plus: Women’s Prize winner, following The Cow Book and who transalates Elena Ferrante’s novels into English?

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and roundup of the latest literary news

From Graham Norton's new novel to Mary McAleese’s memoir, here are our picks

Plus: Irish shortlisted, the letter in The Scarlet Letter, Graham Norton’s birthplace

The National Library of Ireland will be welcoming Dil Wickremasinghe to interview Louise O’Neill about her new book, After the Silence

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

The €100,000 award, sponsored by Dublin City Council, is the world’s most valuable annual prize for a single work of fiction published in English.

Nobel Prize, Women’s Prize, Giller Prize and US National Book Award winners shortlisted

Plus: 2020 International Booker Prize winner and the first names of Goethe, Maupassant and Cervantes

Eugene McCabe: “Having to leave would be a kind of death. That is why I plan to have my ashes spread in the ground of an early [7th century] Celtic church on the farm.” Photograph: Bobbie Hanvey

A quickfire interview from 2011 with the acclaimed author of Death and Nightingales

Eugene McCabe at home in Drumard, Co Monaghan. Photograph: Pat Langan

Acclaimed author of King of the Castle, Death and Nightingales and Troubles screenplays

Marieke Lucas Rijneveld, author of The Discomfort of Evening, and translator Michele Hutchison (left), who won the 2020 International Booker Prize

Debut novel inspired by brother's death makes Dutch writer, 29, youngest winner of translated fiction prize

Donal Ryan: ‘It’s a very personal book, a kind of oblique confrontation of loss and a celebration of familial love.’ Photograph: Alan Place

I felt they’d barely skimmed the books but were bitter about my ‘success’, says the novelist

Hazel Gaynor: Now, more than ever, it seems to me that the past is not a foreign country where people do things differently, but is a reassuringly familiar place, one from which we can draw comfort

Historical novelist Hazel Gaynor turned a family tragedy into an exploration of loss

 Cathy Sweeney:   shortlisted for the 2020 Butler Literary Award, along with her daughterr Lucy Sweeney Byrne; fellow short story writer Wendy Erskine; Ian Maleney; and Oisín Fagan. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and a roundup of the latest literary news

John Hume speaks to the press after the Stormont talks in 1998 that led to the Belfast Agreement. Photograph: Alan Betson

‘His extraordinary impact reflects the exceptional political leader and person he was’

John Hume in Derry in 1999. Photograph:  Bryan O’Brien

What John Hume meant to me: Irish writers, from Michael Longley to Lisa McGee, pay tribute

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Tom Vaughan-Lawlor as Nigel ‘Nidge’ Delaney in Love/Hate

From Nidge and Connell Waldron to Gretta Conroy, Rashers Tierney and Pegeen Mike

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the latest literary news

Colum McCann: longlisted for Apeirogon. Photograph: Jillian Freyer/New York Times

Hilary Mantel looks on course for Booker hat-trick with final part of Wolf Hall trilogy

Margaret Atwood and Bernardine Evaristo, joint winners of the 2019 Booker Prize.

There are several strong Irish contenders for this year’s prize

Test your literary knowledge with 12 questions for 12 months

Adrian McKinty: “Two years ago, I had given up on writing altogether and was working in a bar and driving an uber, and so to go from that to this is just amazing.”

Theakston Old Peculier award goes to a Belfast author for two years in a row

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and a round-up of the latest literary news

Olivia Kiernan: “Once I’m truly in my characters’ world and writing with some speed then longhand isn’t quick enough”

Olivia Kiernan on her latest novel, her writing life and the books she loves

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

A preview of tomorrow’s books pages and a round-up of the latest literary news

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Sarah Gilmartin: “Awards like the Mairtín Crawford are great because they give you the impetus to write. The recognition  is good for the soul, and the money affords you time and space away from other work to persist with writing projects, to go deep into the draft.”

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the week’s literary news

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

A preview of Saturday’s books pages and round-up of the week’s literary news

Niamh Campbell: “To be awarded the equivalent of a year’s salary for a single story is absurdly lucky, but I also feel glad I chased the dream because I feel fulfilled, at a soul level, as a person when I write professionally.”

A Q&A with This Happy author Niamh Campbell, winner of £30,000 short story prize

Maggie O’Farrell, Curtis Sittenfeld and Doireann Ní Ghríofa feature in our summer-friendly titles

10 questions to test your literary knowledge

Colson Whitehead: ‘I lacked the imagination to conceive of how terrible Trump would be.’ Photograph: Simone Padovani/Awakening/Getty

The winner of two Pulitzer prizes on the exhausting task of writing about racism

More articles