Rathmines women’s refuge due to reopen, says Tusla

Centre for domestic violence victims closed in September 2017 over electrical flaws

Repair work on the refuge in Rathmines  was completed in September 2018 and it is being used as a short-term refuge for homeless women until February.

Repair work on the refuge in Rathmines was completed in September 2018 and it is being used as a short-term refuge for homeless women until February.

 

A women’s refuge in south Dublin for victims of domestic violence which closed in 2017 is due to reopen this year, according to Tusla.

The refuge in Rathmines closed in September 2017 after an inspection found there were electrical fixtures which needed to be replaced and repaired.

Work on the building was completed in September 2018 and it is being used as a short-term refuge for homeless women until next month.

“The decision was taken to make the building temporarily available to homeless women for short-term refuge, given the high number of homeless women and families and the potential for adverse weather conditions during the winter months,” a statement from Tusla said.

“The service, which is being undertaken in partnership with the Dublin Regional Homeless Executive, opened on December 17th and accommodates 21 adults each night. It is expected that this service will run until February 2019.”

Tusla said all women and children were relocated to alternative refuges following its closure.

Support services

“Tusla has been providing ongoing support services to the women who wished to remain in contact with the service in order to minimise the impact,” it added.

“Tusla is working to reopen the service and it is hoped that it will open in early 2019.”

Margaret Martin, director of Women’s Aid, said the absence of one of the main refuges in Dublin has been a “key gap” in service provision for women experiencing domestic violence.

“Refuge space was already scarce across Ireland and the temporary closure of Rathmines Women’s Refuge has impacted on the options for women and children who have to flee their homes because of domestic violence,” Ms Martin said.

“While we are pleased to see that the Rathmines refuge building has accommodated homeless women since before Christmas, it is imperative that the 10 safe family spaces provided by Rathmines refuge are available as a matter of urgency to women and their children who are experiencing domestic violence.”