Ghostbusters star Leslie Jones bombarded with racist tweets

Comedian victim of campaign of racially charged slurs on Twitter

 Leslie Jones  at the premiere of   Ghostbusters in Hollywood, California, on July 9th. The comedian was subject to racist abuse on social network Twitter. Photograph:  Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

Leslie Jones at the premiere of Ghostbusters in Hollywood, California, on July 9th. The comedian was subject to racist abuse on social network Twitter. Photograph: Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

 

Comedian Leslie Jones, who stars in the new Ghostbusters movie, has become the latest victim in Twitter’s struggle to control abusive speech on its platform.

Following the film’s opening weekend, Jones found herself singled out for a particularly egregious campaign of racially charged slurs, many of which she retweeted from her account.

In a stream of tweets on Monday evening, Jones addressed the attacks directly. “It’s so sad, most of these comments sound like they are from ignorant children,” she said. “You have to hate yourself to put out that type of hate. I mean on my worst day I can’t think of this type of hate to put out.”

“I don’t know how to feel. I’m numb. Actually numb. I see the words and pics and videos. Videos y’all. Meaning people took time to spew hate,” she continued. “I use to wonder why some celebs don’t have Twitter accts now I know. You can’t be nice and communicate with fans cause people crazy.”




Jones posted a tweet saying she was quitting the social media platform. She wrote: “I leave Twitter tonight with tears and a very sad heart.All this cause I did a movie.You can hate the movie but the shit I got today...wrong.

On Monday, in response to the latest wave of abuse, Feig tweeted: “Leslie Jones is one of the greatest people I know. Any personal attacks against her are attacks against us all,” and encouraged people to tweet their support for Jones under the hashtag #LoveForLeslieJ.

In March the comedian said that she was considering quitting the social media platform, when she first began being targeted by trolls, but she was entreated to stay by Paul Feig, who directed the film.

A 2014 study by the think tank Demos focusing on a nine-day period in November 2012 found “approximately 10,000 uses per day of racist and ethnic slur terms”, of which 500-2,000 were directed at individuals.

And the new Ghostbusters reboot has become a particular focal point for misogynist abuse because of its female cast, leading to an orchestrated online campaign to make the trailer the most disliked in YouTube history.

– (Guardian service)