Pub dismissal case, Dublin port volumes decline, and Google’s profit shifting

Business Today: the best news, analysis and comment from The Irish Times business desk

Freight trucks at Dublin Port in January. Trade volumes declined by 15 per cent in the first quarter, due in part to the impact of Brexit.  Photograph: Sasko Lazarov/RollingNews.ie

Freight trucks at Dublin Port in January. Trade volumes declined by 15 per cent in the first quarter, due in part to the impact of Brexit. Photograph: Sasko Lazarov/RollingNews.ie

 

Louis Fitzgerald’s pub grouppaid a private investigator to arrange for a 17-year old to buy alcohol in one of its bars in a move that led to the dismissal of one of its workers, Labour Court documents show. Mr Fitzgerald’s company is appealing an earlier finding at the Work Relations Commission in relation to the dismissal of the employee. Barry O’Halloran has the details of the case.

Brexit triggered a major reduction in cargo volumes at Dublin Port in the first quarter of this year. The Dublin Port Company said trade volumes fell by 15.2 per cent in the first three months of 2021. Eoin Burke-Kennedy examines the numbers.

Googleshifted more than $75.4 billion (€63 billion) in profits out of the Republic using the controversial “double-Irish” tax arrangement in 2019, the last year in which it used the loophole. Charlie Taylor goes through the numbers.

UK insurance giant Legal & General has made its first foray into the social housing market in Ireland, acquiring a 40-unit apartment scheme in Raheny, north Dublin, in partnership with Irish housing agency Clúid. Eoin Burke-Kennedy reports.

Multinational law firm Hatstone is establishing its European Union base in the Republic through a deal with the partners of Tully Rinckey (Ireland). Barry O’Halloran has the details.

Recent claims that living standards in Northern Ireland are 20 per cent higher than the Republic are not borne out by the data, writes Eoin Burke-Kennedy.

In our weekly opinion piece, personal finance expert Brendan Burgess says the exits of Ulster Bank and KBC will leave the remaining domestic lenders free to push up their interest rates over time.

As workplaces begin to reopen, we should prepare ourselves for the new politics of resentment in the office, writes FT columnist Pilita Clark.

Stay up to date with all our business news: sign up to our business news alerts and our Business Today daily email news digest.