USI praise Irish universities for continuation of consent education

Sin.ie editor Sorcha O'Connor reports on the reaction to the introduction of consent classes for students across Ireland

'Students are made consider how assault occurs on campus, in public and in relationships, and it also gives students the opportunity to reflect on what consent means and when someone is in a position to give, or not give, consent.' Archive image shows Aerial view of NUI Galway Quadrangle.

'Students are made consider how assault occurs on campus, in public and in relationships, and it also gives students the opportunity to reflect on what consent means and when someone is in a position to give, or not give, consent.' Archive image shows Aerial view of NUI Galway Quadrangle.

 

The Union of Students in Ireland (USI) last week praised third level institutes across Ireland for introducing consent classes for students, with which the main aim is to normalise speech around consent and encourage people to know their rights around bodily autonomy.

As USI launches their 2016 Sexual Health and Guidance (SHAG) week, they are encouraging more colleges across Ireland to consider introducing consent classes.

The USI outlined that at consent classes, students are made consider how assault occurs on campus, in public and in relationships, and it also gives students the opportunity to reflect on what consent means and when someone is in a position to give, or not give, consent.

“Consent classes are the fastest and most efficient way to educate people on what is and is not acceptable when it comes to sexual activity and relationships,” said Annie Hoey, President of USI.

“We need to teach young people to talk about consent, to report violence and rape, and ensure that consent is asked at all times before sex. Sex without consent is rape. These classes will encourage participants to explore sexual wellbeing and their own personal boundaries, remove any stigmas associated with consent and reporting incidents, and reduce the attitude of victim blaming,” she continued.

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