This Album Changed My Life: Wild Beasts – Two Dancers (2009)

Talos on the soundtrack to his 20s, full of raw humanity, boozy nights, fragility and love

Talos: I will forever have Two Dancers’ tingling aftertaste dancing on my tongue. Photograph: Brendan Canty

Talos: I will forever have Two Dancers’ tingling aftertaste dancing on my tongue. Photograph: Brendan Canty

 

Two Dancers was in many ways the soundtrack to my 20s, full of raw humanity, boozy nights, puffed-up chests, questions, fragility and love. The album first set its claws in me after I saw Wild Beasts play at Cyprus Avenue in Cork in 2010, a gig that made you feel you had witnessed something important, cast out upon a landscape largely occupied by boisterous masculinity.

The album itself was the band’s second, and is one that demonstrates legitimate sonic growth and a real hunger to excel beyond what already existed. What I loved about the band was how they spoke about their music being of a place. It never tried to sound like it was made in Los Angeles or in some Scandipop candyfloss sweatshop. Instead it was embedded in the Lake District, dark London streets, or a skaggy alley next to some dingy nightclub in Leeds. Lyrically, it is a marvel; wide-eyed, brave and multisensory, as in these lines from Hooting & Howling:

Wild Beasts: Hooting & Howling

Wild Beasts: Alpha Female

Carry me, hooting and howling
To the river to wash off my hands
Of the hot blood, the sweat and the sand

If there is more to come from the Beasts, who broke up earlier this year, then I wait with bated breath. If not, to leave behind a piece of work with such heft and beauty is something to be utterly proud of. I will forever have its tingling aftertaste dancing on my tongue. – In conversation with Niall Byrne

The deluxe edition of Talos’s Choice-nominated album, Wild Alee, is on BMG. Talos plays the Academy in Dublin on October 6th and Cork Opera House on October 28th, with further Irish dates in December

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.