Halfords sees 700% increase in sales of e-scooters

Government has committed to legislating for the use of electric scooters in the next year

Motoring and bike retailer Halfords has seen a seven-fold increase in the sale of electric scooters.

Motoring and bike retailer Halfords has seen a seven-fold increase in the sale of electric scooters.

 

Motoring and bike retailer Halfords has seen a seven-fold increase in the sale of electric scooters across its 24 stores over the last two months.

Electric scooters are not regulated in Ireland and are currently illegal on public roads. However, the programme for government has committed to “legislate for e-scooters and e-bikes”. Minister for Transport Eamon Ryan has indicated this will happen next year.

The decision follows on from the publication of the Road Safety Authority’s report in August which recommended for electric scooter legislation to be adapted to enable lawful use on public roads.

Halfords said it has conducted research that suggests more than half of people who have short commutes to work wish to use them.

It also said the survey of 2,000 people, in partnership with YouGov, showed that more than half of people think legalisation can help to address congestion and air pollution issues.

“Along with e-bikes, the safe use of e-scooters has the potential to revolutionise the way we travel and can help address pollution and congestion problems,” it said.

Consumer demand

Halfords e-mobility expert Matt Banks said: “The big rise in consumer demand for e-scooters means there should be new laws in place to regulate their use and let everyone enjoy the benefits they can bring.

“The safe use of e-scooters has the potential to revolutionise the way we travel and can help address pollution and congestion problems.

“With a clear legal framework in place – in line with that which governs the use of bikes and e-bikes – e-scooters could be responsibly enjoyed by people across Ireland, replacing countless car journeys.

“E-scooters also help to address problems around congestion and air pollution and are potentially a gateway product for those looking to join the electric revolution. They are an option for those who can’t afford an electric car for example.

“If made legal for use on public roads, they will also allow people to travel without using public transport.”