‘See you at the beach’: Reaction to Germany's World Cup exit

There was a mixture of despondency, disbelief and glee in Germany and further afield

Hundreds of Mexican soccer fans partied outside the South Korean embassy in Mexico City on Wednesday to thank the Asian country for its victory over Germany, which guaranteed the national team a spot in the knock-out stages of the World Cup.

 

In Germany

Niedergeschlagenheit (noun, feminine): Despondency

German football fans, who had never seen their country fall at the first hurdle of a World Cup finals before, will recognise it as they pick up their papers on Thursday morning.

Their team, the holders and one of the pre-tournament favourites, finished bottom of Group F after a 2-0 defeat to South Korea on Wednesday.

Bild

Germany’s most popular newspaper is “speechless” as it contrasts its front page from June 2014 – after the national team inflicted a 7-1 semi-final defeat on Brazil on its way to winning the World Cup – with its Thursday edition.

The headline is the same. The story is not.

Die Welt

“Over and out,” says Die Welt, next to a picture of a crestfallen Toni Kroos. He had looked like Germany’s saviour after a stunning late winner against Sweden. But he was unable to haul his team into the second round.

Rheinische Post

The Düsseldorf-based paper is even more succinct. “Out” is its one-word headline.

Frankfurter Allgemeine

The paper calls the defeat “Germany’s downfall”. Like Die Welt, it also contrasts Wednesday’s defeat against South Korea with the hope felt after the last-gasp victory over Sweden looked to have revved-up the nation’s stalling World Cup campaign. Instead, it says, Germany is “back to earth with a bump”.

Rest of the world

Schadenfreude (noun, feminine): Taking pleasure in the misfortune of others

British football fans, most of whom have seen their country fall at the first hurdle in a World Cup tournament, will recognise it as they pick up their papers on Thursday morning.

The Sun and the Daily Telegraph go for similar headlines:

The back pages of the Times and the Guardian focus on the historic nature of Germany’s humiliation.

The Star and the Daily Mail bask in the warm glow of Germany's exit.

But the best front page surely has to go to Corriere dello Sport in Italy who simply say "see you at the beach". 

– Guardian service

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