Banking inquiry: Timeline

Former financial regulator Patrick NearyPatrick Neary arriving at the Oireachtas banking inquiry last May. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill.

Former financial regulator Patrick NearyPatrick Neary arriving at the Oireachtas banking inquiry last May. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill.

 

2008

March 17th: St Paddy’s Day massacre as Anglo shares plummet 30 per cent in price.

September 15th: US bank Lehman Brothers collapses.

September 29th - 30th: Government agrees a blanket bank guarantee covering all six institutions.

2009

January 21st: Anglo nationalised after emergency legislation passed .

2010

November 18th: EU and IMF negotiators in Dublin for talks on a rescue plan.

November 19th: ECB president Jean Claude Trichet writes to minister for finance Brian Lenihan threatening to cut off emergency funding from the Irish banks.

November 29th: Ireland enters the bailout programme as the EU and the government announce they have agreed the State will get €85 billion in financial support.

2011

September 8th: Trichet rules out supporting minister for finance Michael Noonan in introducing burden-sharing.

2014

December 17th: First public hearing of Oireachtas banking inquiry.

2015

April 22nd: Current Nama chief executive and former National Treasury Management Agency executive Brendan McDonagh tells committee the NTMA was invited to Government Buildings on the night of guarantee, but was kept outside the room.

April 30th: Former ECB president Jean Claude Trichet denies he threatened Lenihan ahead of Ireland entering a bailout programme.

May 28th: Former financial regulator Patrick Neary apologises for his role in crash and confirms he argued for a blanket bank guarantee.

June 18th: Former secretary general at the Department of Finance Kevin Cardiff gives evidence Ireland was pushed hard into bailout.

July 8th: Former taoiseach Brian Cowen denies he overruled Brian Lenihan on night of guarantee.

September 10th: Former deputy director of IMF Ajai Chopra says the ECB gave Ireland an ultimatum.

September 10th: As last witness of the inquiry Minister for Finance Michael Noonan says Trichet warned him a bomb would go off in Dublin if he moved to burden share.

November: Committee members receive a draft copy of final report, but rule it not fit for purpose.

November 21st: Team put in place to rescue report.

December 10th: Report given to interested parties.

December 31st: Thirty-three responses are considered by committee. Developers Michael O’Flynn and Johnny Ronan threaten legal action, while Brian Cowen and John Hurley allege the report impugns their good names. Committee agrees to make some small changes and signs off on final report.

2016

January 14th: Emergency meeting called as developers issue new legal threats. Small changes made.