Preti Taneja wins Desmond Elliott Prize

A sneak preview of Saturday's books pages

 Desmond Elliott Prize winner Preti Taneja, author of We That Are Young. Photograph: Louise Haywood-Schiefer/ Desmond Elliott Prize/PA

Desmond Elliott Prize winner Preti Taneja, author of We That Are Young. Photograph: Louise Haywood-Schiefer/ Desmond Elliott Prize/PA

 

Preti Taneja has been awarded the 2018 Desmond Elliott Prize for her debut novel, We That Are Young. The work re-imagines Shakespeare’s King Lear, setting it in contemporary India. The novel takes the play’s central themes and juxtaposes them against the 2011 anti-corruption riots in India.

In her Irish Times review, Sarah Gilmartin called it “a remarkable picture of contemporary India”. “For a relatively new writer, she is a master of ambivalence... [T]he strong ethical sense to her writing is subtly incorporated in her novel through character and action.”

Taneja’s triumph is the second time Norwich-based publisher Galley Beggar Press has produced the winner of this prestigious award. Eimear McBride’s A Girl was a Half-Formed Thing won in 2014.

In Ticket tomorrow, Anna Carey has been reading round the clock to come up with a list of the 25 best summer reads; Martina Evans explores the deep family and research roots of her new poetry collection focused on the War of Indepdence and Civil War; while fellow poet David Wheatley tackles poetry in the age of Brexit; plus we have a host of reviews: Breandán Mac Suibhne on The Preacher and the Prelate: The Achill Mission Colony and the Battle for Souls in Famine Ireland by Patricia Byrne; Danny Denton on Room to Dream by David Lynch and Kristine McKenna; Fionnuala O Connor on Siobhan Fenton’s The Good Friday Agreement; Seán Hewitt on Good Trouble by Joseph O’Neill; Belinda McKeon on Days of Awe by AM Homes; Jonathan McAloon on The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh; Mia Gallagher on I Still Dream by James Smythe; Paul McVeigh on The Last Romeo by Justin Myers; Houman Barekat on The Tyranny of Lost Things by Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett; Jane Urquart on Homesick Songs by Emma Hopper; Neil Hegarty on The Consolation of Maps by Thomas Bourke; Sarah Gilmartin on An Ocean of Minutes by Thea Lim; Julie Parsons on by Jeanette Winterson; and Sara Keating on the best new children’s titles.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.