Women smokers wanted for Trinity research programme

College leading study to find out what works best to stop women smoking

The study programme is being carried out with the Irish Cancer Society and the HSE. Photograph: iStock

The study programme is being carried out with the Irish Cancer Society and the HSE. Photograph: iStock

 

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin (TCD) are looking for 240 women across Ireland to participate in a stop smoking research programme.

The women involved must be smokers. The research will compare two different stop smoking programmes. One is based in the community and is specifically designed for the women.

The other is a HSE stop smoking locally-based service designed both for men and women.

The study programme is being carried out with the Irish Cancer Society and the HSE. It is currently looking for women aged 18 and upwards to participate in the study which is being rolled out in parts of Dublin and Cork.

The study will be conducted with the support of local community development agencies in four waves in parts of Dublin and Cork between February 2018 and June 2019. Recruitment for the first wave is currently under way in the Liberties area of Dublin 8 and central areas of Dublin 2.

The second wave will take place in the Gould’s Hill, Mallow, and Fermoy town in Co Cork with recruitment due to start in late February. The third wave will be run in the northside of Cork city in September.

The fourth wave takes place in the Ballyfermot and Cherry Orchard areas of Dublin 10 in January 2019.

Six weeks

Each district will be allocated to either one of the two stop smoking programmes. Each woman will be offered six weeks of close monitoring and support.

At 12 weeks from the start of the programme, the researchers will assess how effective each programme was in supporting the women to stop smoking.

Women will be invited back to their community programme after six months to assess their progress, discuss how the programme worked for them and to monitor the long-term benefits of taking part in the programme.

“Even if you are just thinking about quitting, taking part in this research, specifically designed to help women smokers, will be of benefit to you,” said Catherine Hayes the associate professor in public health in Trinity College Dublin (TCD) who is leading the study.

Irish Cancer Society community programmes manager Joanne Vance said women smoke for a “range of complex reasons.

“This is why we want to investigate new approaches to help women to quit smoking. We are delighted to be a part of this initiative which will help inform how smoking cessation programmes are designed and delivered over the coming years.

“Investing in smoking cessation services is one of the most cost-effective ways of improving the nation’s health and reducing the risk of cancer.”