Why I Love . . . Road bowling

My earliest memory was seeing my dad and brothers head off to a bowling score, but I was too young

Joanne Murphy: ‘In 2017, I won the Junior Ladies Championship in the North-East Region. This win was special to me as I had been beaten narrowly in the two years before that.’

Joanne Murphy: ‘In 2017, I won the Junior Ladies Championship in the North-East Region. This win was special to me as I had been beaten narrowly in the two years before that.’

 

Road bowling is played over a predetermined course distance of normal roadway. It is played with a 28oz solid-iron bowl. Two players, who are equally matched in skill, aim to throw their bowl over a sop (a lump of grass) on the road, and whoever crosses the finish line first in fewer shots wins.

I first got interested in road bowling through my late father, Thady, who was heavily involved in bowling throughout his life. My earliest memory of bowling was seeing my dad and brothers head off to a bowling “score” (match), and I couldn’t go because I was still deemed too young. You can imagine my delight when I finally got to see road bowling, and at that moment, I fell in love with it.

I had my first competitive score on my 11th birthday which, thankfully, I won. “You bowled out of your skin” is a common phrase in bowling circles, and you know you bowled well when you hear it.

I train once a week with Denis Horgan at the Social Road Bowling Club in Cork. If I’m getting ready to compete, I’ll up my training to twice if not three times a week, to build up speed, delivery, and accuracy.

In 2017, I won the Junior Ladies Championship in the North-East Region. This win was special to me as I had been beaten narrowly in the two years before that. To have won after the heartache of loss was the best feeling in the world. I retained the title in 2018. 

I would encourage anyone to get involved in bowling, especially girls. If you know anyone who’s involved with bowling, or you have seen it being played on country roads, go and try it. You might be a natural. 

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.