Chairwoman of Irish Water parent to resign

Rose Hynes says she cannot commit the time to Ervia

Rose Hynes, chairwoman of Ervia, recently joined the board of agri-business company, Origin Enterprises, and also chairs the Shannon Group, the State entity responsible for Shannon Airport and the region’s tourism and commercial development.

Rose Hynes, chairwoman of Ervia, recently joined the board of agri-business company, Origin Enterprises, and also chairs the Shannon Group, the State entity responsible for Shannon Airport and the region’s tourism and commercial development.

 

Rose Hynes, the chairwoman of Ervia, the State company that controls Irish Water, plans to resign from the role this week to focus on other commitments.

Ms Hynes recently joined the board of agri-business company, Origin Enterprises, and also chairs the Shannon Group, the State entity responsible for Shannon Airport and the region’s tourism and commercial development.

Owen Killian is shortly due to step down as chair of Origin.

Ervia confirmed yesterday that she has signalled her intention to resign as its chairwoman on Friday, October 16th, as she will no longer be able to commit the necessary time and attention to the company.

Ms Hynes also sits on the boards of fruit importer and distributor, Total Produce, investment company, One51, and the Shannon-based manufacturer of mining equipment, Mincon.

It is understood that following her appointment to Origin at the beginning of the month, Ms Hynes indicated to colleagues that she intended to reduce her commitments elsewhere.

Ervia controls both Irish Water and Gas Networks, the State utility that owns and operates the country’s natural gas distribution network.

Ms Hynes first became a director of Bord Gáis and was appointed to its chair six years ago.

She oversaw the sale of Bord Gáis Energy to British utility, Centrica, in a deal valued at €1 billion, early last year.

Ms Hynes then took the chair of Ervia, established by the Government to take responsibility for the natural gas network and Irish Water.

The Fine Gale-Labour coalition’s decision to establish Irish Water and introduce domestic water charges last year turned out to be one of its most controversial.

Opposition to the charges was marked by a series of demonstrations in Dublin in 2014 and earlier this year.

Public anger against the move was further stirred early last year when it emerged that Irish Water was spending €86 million on legal and cosultancy fees.