Proposed league will be rejected by fans – Claudio Ranieri

Money-driven European Super League against spirit of sport, says Leicester City manager

Manager Claudio Ranieri talks during the Leicester City press conference at King Power Stadium on Friday. Photograph: Getty.

Manager Claudio Ranieri talks during the Leicester City press conference at King Power Stadium on Friday. Photograph: Getty.

 

Leicester City manager Claudio Ranieri has said the mooted European Super League would be against the spirit of sport and represent a case of big-name clubs punishing smaller ones for their own failings.

Executives from Arsenal, Chelsea, Manchester United, Manchester City and Liverpool held talks in London this week with Charlie Stillitano, the chairman of Relevant Sports, an American firm interested in exploring the idea of setting up a Europe-wide league reserved for the continent’s richest clubs.

Five aristocrats

Ranieri said that while a breakaway league might be in the financial interests of the big clubs, sports lovers would reject it.

“People must think what the fans want, not only about money,” added the Italian. “Because culture and the fans are more important than other things.”

Ranieri suggested that the nature of sport demands that rather than plot a breakaway when faced with stronger competition, traditional powers should reflect on how to rise to the new challenges.

“That’s sport,” he said. “I understand they want to do something but if something strange happens, don’t blame the little teams. They have to blame themselves. Maybe they have a good idea. But they should ask ‘why is a little team like Leicester doing better than us?’”

Dynamic midfielder

“There will be a big battle in every match now,” Ranieri said. “Not only for us but for all the Premier League. Now nobody can enjoy, everybody must win, so there is a change in the philosophy now.”

The Leicester manager insisted he does not care about the result in Saturday’s north-London derby, when the two teams directly below Leicester go head to head.

“I try to put my philosophy into the minds of the players,” he said. “It is not to see the others. It’s not important, it doesn’t matter. What is important is what we are doing. We have to think about what we can do. In the end if somebody is above us, ‘well done’.” Guardian Service

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.