Paula Radcliffe insists she never cheated in athletics career

Women’s marathon record holder implicated in doping scandal by Tory MP

Paula Radcliffe, who is the world record holder in women’s marathon. Photograph: Ian Walton/Getty Images

Paula Radcliffe, who is the world record holder in women’s marathon. Photograph: Ian Walton/Getty Images

 

A “devastated” Paula Radcliffe has insisted she has never cheated “in any form whatsoever at any time in my career”, following a British parliamentary select committee hearing into doping allegations she claimed forced her to speak out.

The marathon world record holder, one of Britain’s best-loved athletes who retired from competition this year because of injury, had not been named in connection with the recent spate of allegations regarding blood doping that have engulfed the sport.

Implicated

But after Jesse Norman, the Tory MP who chairs the culture, media and sport select committee, asked questions that appeared to suggest a British winner of the London Marathon was “potentially” implicated, Radcliffe said she had no choice but to speak out in order to clear her name.

“These accusations threaten to undermine all I have stood and competed for, as well as my hard-earned reputation.

“By linking me to allegations of cheating, damage done to my name and reputation can never be fully repaired, no matter how untrue I know them to be,” said Radcliffe, whose 2003 marathon world record of 2:15.25 in London remains almost three minutes faster than any other woman in history.

Reputation

“It is profoundly disappointing that the cloak of parliamentary privilege has been used to effectively implicate me, tarnishing my reputation, with full knowledge that I have no recourse against anyone for repeating what has been said at the committee hearing.”

Radcliffe’s name had been in circulation since December last year, when a leaked list of athletes with suspicious blood values began to circulate having featured in German broadcaster ARD’s documentary into systemic doping in Russia.

Interest was raised when a larger leak of 12,000 blood tests from 5,000 athletes was used by the Sunday Times and ARD as the basis for claims in August this year. Guardian Service

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.